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Editorial articles

March 2004 Br J Cardiol 2004;11:89-91

OTC statins: the implications for primary prevention in the UK

Rubin Minhas

Abstract

The difficulty in delivering a viable primary prevention
policy has been evident ever since the publication of
the National Service Framework for Coronary Heart
Disease (NSF-CHD).

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March 2004 Br J Cardiol (Acute Interv Cardiol) 2004;11:AIC 3–AIC 6

Cardiac enzyme release following percutaneous coronary intervention

Jason Causer, Martyn Wood, Rodney H Stables

Abstract

The measurement of biochemical markers of myocardial cell damage is a key component of modern cardiology practice. The use of these tests in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction (MI) has been routine for three decades, with the measurement of serum levels of creatine kinase (CK) and its myocardial band isofraction (CK-MB) emerging as the traditional standard in this respect.

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March 2004 Br J Cardiol (Acute Interv Cardiol) 2004;11:AIC 7

A good thing after all? Raised cardiac enzymes after PCI

Nick Curzen

Abstract

In this issue of Acute and Interventional Cardiology there is a commissioned editorial about the release of cardiac enzymes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). This remains a contentious area and attracts the views of two opposing schools of thought.

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January 2004 Br J Cardiol 2004;11:22-3

Heart failure beyond maximum medical management

Jeremy Bray

Abstract

The management of advanced heart failure when medical treatment alone is no longer sufficient was the focus of the 2003 British Society for Heart Failure (BSH) annual autumn meeting, held in Oxford on 28 November.

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January 2004 Br J Cardiol 2004;11:16-21

Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids: mechanisms and clinical applications explored

BJCardio editorial team

Abstract

A joint British Journal of Cardiology and H.E.A.R.T UK round table meeting held at the National Heart and Lung Institute, 18th November 2003.

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January 2004 Br J Cardiol 2004;11:5-7

Cardiac pathology – a dying trade?

Mary N Sheppard

Abstract

It seems ironic that, at a time of ultra-specialisation, when
the public is demanding higher standards from doctors,
academic medicine is being downgraded. Cardiac pathology
represents a perfect case in point.

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November 2003 Br J Cardiol 2003;10:428-30

Training in cardiology – the next decade

John Greenwood

Abstract

The introduction of the first specialist registrar training programme in December 1995 brought a radical overhaul in higher specialist training. Each speciality produced a curriculum establishing specific training objectives against which the progress of an individual trainee could be judged.

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November 2003 Br J Cardiol 2003;10:426-7

BANCC: the changing role of the cardiac nurse

Debbie Hughes

Abstract

The traditional role of the cardiac nurse, particularly at the inception of the coronary care unit (CCU), has been evolving since the early 60s.

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November 2003 Br J Cardiol 2003;10:424-5

Rehabilitation: quantity and quality will count

J Malcolm Walker

Abstract

Cardiac rehabilitation has historically been an underdeveloped service in the UK. It is now recognised as an essential component in the management of heart disease and will shortly encompass those at risk of developing cardiovascular disorders.

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November 2003 Br J Cardiol 2003;10:421-3

NHA: the evolving role of the nurse in hypertension

Susan Kennedy

Abstract

Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for vascular disease and its treatment to target requires not only careful monitoring with lifestyle advice and pharmacological intervention but also a good understanding of the condition by the patient.

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