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Editorial articles

August 2002 Br J Cardiol 2002;9:

The Impact of Nicorandil in Angina (IONA) study

BJCardio editorial team

Abstract

The Impact of Nicorandil in Angina (IONA) study A report from a British Cardiac Society Satellite Symposium, 2002 Angina pectoris is not a benign disease: it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and it affects more than 10% of men over the age of 60 years.

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July 2002 Br J Cardiol 2002;9:377

Journal links with British Hypertension Society information service

Bryan Williams

Abstract

I am delighted that The British Journal of Cardiology is to become an official journal of the British Hypertension Society (BHS) information service. The BHS information service was developed to provide doctors and other health care professionals with information about hypertension. This includes details of current clinical management guidelines, recommended blood pressure monitoring devices and succinct summaries of management issues pertaining to specific clinical scenarios.

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July 2002 Br J Cardiol 2002;9:373-6

Atherosclerosis imaging and coronary calcification: the UK perspective

Gareth J Morgan-Hughes, Carl A Roobottom, Andrew J Marshall

Abstract

Concerning atherosclerosis imaging and coronary calcium concentrates predominantly on electron beam computed tomography (EBCT).1 Non-invasive coronary artery imaging can take the form of coronary artery calcium assessment or coronary angiography. Imaging can be performed with EBCT, or since 2001, with the latest generation of helical (‘spiral’) CT scanners (known as ‘multislice’ CT scanners in view of simultaneous acquisition of four image ‘slices’). There are major differences between EBCT and multi-slice helical CT. Whereas with helical CT the patient is continually advanced through a rapid mechanically rotating gantry (X-ray source and detector array), EBCT relies on X-rays produced with an electronically steered electron beam.

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June 2002 Br J Cardiol 2002;9:

Taking vascular disease beyond convention

BJCardio editorial team

Abstract

Taking vascular disease beyond convention Using the full lipid profile to identify and reduce the risk of coronary heart disease Lipid levels: risks and targets Prioritisation of high-risk coronary heart disease patients for statin intervention Key guideline cholesterol targets and full lipid profiling Scientific summary Introduction S1 Lipid levels: risks and targets S2 Prioritisation of high-risk coronary heart disease patients for statin intervention S3 Section 1: Key guideline cholesterol targets and full lipid profiling S4 Section 2: Scientific summary S5 Section 3: Patient identification S7 Section 4: Management strategies S9 Section 5: Practical use of clinical laboratories S10 Section 6: Tools for full lipid profiling and risk status calculation S11 Conclusion S11 Acknowledgements S12 Appendix 1: HDL, the metabolic syndrome and CHD risk S12 Appendix 2: Joint British societies coronary risk prediction charts S14 References S15 Patient identification Management strategies Practical use of clinical laboratories Tools for full lipid profiling and risk status calculation HDL, the metabolic syndrome and CHD risk.

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June 2002 Br J Cardiol 2002;9:313-6

Left ventricular hypertrophy: a target for treatment

Jamil Mayet, Rebecca Lane

Abstract

Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is more than just an adaptive response to the increase in left ventricular wall stress caused by hypertension. It has long been known that it is an indicator of a poor prognosis: the increased risk associated with LVH is independent of the blood pressure level.

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May 2002 Br J Cardiol 2002;9:255-7

Garlic in cardiovascular disease – the last word?

James M Lawrence, John PD Reckless

Abstract

Garlic has been used for its potential medicinal properties for centuries. It was cited 3,500 years ago by the Egyptians as useful in the treatment of heart disease, tumours, bites and worms. Interest in its use, particularly in reducing cardiovascular disease, has increased markedly over the past two decades with the rise in use of complementary and alternative medicines.

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May 2002 Br J Cardiol 2002;9:251-4

Unstable angina: the case for selective aggression

Elliot J Smith, Nicholas P Curzen

Abstract

The prognosis for patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (ACS) is not benign. Ongoing ischaemia is only one determinant of risk. The presence of ST-segment depression or elevated level of troponins is known to identify a group of patients at high risk of further events (death, MI, re-admission with ACS).The key management issue, however, is regarding which of these patients require early (i.e. in-hospital) revascularisation. Based upon current evidence from studies including FRISC II, TIMI-18, and the recent re-analysis of TIMI-III, our current strategy is to offer invasive investigation and revascularisation to all patients identified as ‘high risk’.

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April 2002 Br J Cardiol 2002;9:233-40

What’s new in hypertension

Ola Soyinka

Abstract

Is it time to forget about diastolic blood pressure? Should we abandon the mercury sphygmomanometer? Is non-pharmacological intervention a waste of time? These were some of the questions discussed at the first Primary Care Cardiovascular Society (PCCS) meeting of 2002 which was carried out jointly with the British Hypertension Society (BHS) on 26th February.

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April 2002 Br J Cardiol 2002;9:195-7

The quest for diagnostic certainty: an unreal expectation in a real world

Paul Collinson, Peter Stubbs

Abstract

When is an infarct not an infarct? When it is an infarctlet, a necroset or a troponinosis.1 The advent of the cardiac-specific troponins as diagnostic tests has created confusion in the minds of some cardiologists. The fact that cardiac troponins may be used to diagnose previously unsuspected myocardial damage in patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes, when acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been ruled out by conventional World Health Organization criteria, has been amply demonstrated since the original report by Hamm et al.

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