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Thrombus aspiration in primary percutaneous coronary intervention: to use or not to use?

December 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:152–6 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.032 Clinical article

Thrombus aspiration in primary percutaneous coronary intervention: to use or not to use?

Telal Mudawi, Mohamed Wasfi, Darar Al-Khdair, Muath Al-Anbaei, Assem Fathi, Nikolay Lilyanov, Mohammed Elsayed, Ahmed Amin, Dalia Besada, Waleed Alenezi, Waleed Shabanh

Abstract

Thrombus aspiration during primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has been extensively studied. Conflicting results have consistently emerged, hence, no clear guidance has been produced. The authors have examined several key clinical trials and meta-analyses, and discovered, arguably, major flaws within the designs of most trials, thus, accounting for the persistently discordant results. The authors conclude that there is some evidence to support the selective use of thrombectomy in primary PCI but a large-scale trial with the appropriate patient selection criteria is needed in order to substantiate or refute the argument.

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November 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:131–132 News and views

Peripheral arterial disease assessment training tool

November 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:133 News and views

In brief

Cholesterol: the evolving story – HEART UK 30th annual conference

November 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:136 Meeting reportNews and views

Cholesterol: the evolving story – HEART UK 30th annual conference

October 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:133–5 Meeting reportNews and views

News from the ESC Congress 2016

Spinal cord stimulation for refractory angina: 100 case-experience from the National Refractory Angina Service

July 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:106–9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.025 Online First

Spinal cord stimulation for refractory angina: 100 case-experience from the National Refractory Angina Service

Blandina Gomes, Kamen Valchanov, William Davies, Adam Brown, Peter Schofield

Abstract

Refractory angina represents an important clinical problem. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for refractory angina has been used for over two decades to improve pain and, thus, quality of life. This case series reports the clinical efficacy and safety profile of SCS.

We included patients who had a SCS device implanted between 2001 and 2015 following a rigorous selection process. Patients were prospectively followed. We performed a descriptive analysis and used paired t-test to evaluate the difference in Canadian Cardiovascular Society angina (CCS) class before and after SCS implant.

Of the 100 patients included, 89% were male, the mean age was 65.1 years and mean follow-up time was 53.6 months. The CCS class after SCS implant was statistically improved from before (p<0.05) and 88% of patients who gave feedback were very satisfied. Thirty-two patients died, 58% of those who had a documented cause of death, died from a non-cardiac cause.

This study shows the outcome of 14 years’ experience of SCS implantation. The anginal symptoms had a statistically significant improvement and the satisfaction rate was higher than 90%. The complication rate is within the range reported in the literature. SCS seems to be an effective and safe treatment option for refractory angina.

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June 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:61–4 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.020 Clinical article

Clinical and psychological outcomes of an angina management programme

Deborah Tinson, Samantha Swartzman, Kate Lang, Sheena Spense, Iain Todd

Abstract

Chronic refractory angina results in significant NHS costs due to chronic high use of resources. This audit evaluated the clinical effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioural (CBT) programme in reducing angina symptoms after maximal medical and surgical intervention. The primary outcome was self-reported angina. Additional questionnaire data comprised perceived quality of life/disability, angina misconceptions, self-efficacy and mood. Data from the electronic patient administration system was used to compare use of cardiology hospital resources in the two years before and two years after attendance. Patients completing questionnaires reported significant improvements in all areas post-group and at two months. Resource use was lower in the two years post-programme than the two years prior. A CBT-based approach to symptom management could offer additional clinical benefits in the cardiac rehabilitation menu.

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Cardiorenal medicine: challenges for the decade ahead

February 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:(1) Online First

Cardiorenal medicine: challenges for the decade ahead

August 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:89–90 News and views

NICE quality standard on AF

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