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November 2005 Br J Cardiol 2005;12:409-10 Editorial

Combating vascular disease in Scotland

Alan G Begg

Abstract

As an organisation we are delighted that, as from this
issue, The British Journal of Cardiology will become
the official journal of the Scottish Heart and Arterial
Risk Prevention group (SHARP). SHARP, a registered charity
launched in Scotland in 1988, now attracts members from
across the UK bringing together a wide range of healthcare
professionals interested in the prevention and management
of cardiovascular disease (CVD).

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May 2005 Br J Cardiol 2005;12(Suppl 1):S2-S7 Supplement

This House believes that the UK healthcare system may be failing as many as 50% of patients with hyperlipidaemia by not reducing their cholesterol to effective levels: a debate

Dr Clive Weston, Dr Nigel Capps, Dr Stewart Findlay, Ms Julie Foxton, Professor Richard Hobbs, Dr Terry McCormack, Dr Jim McMorran, Dr John Pittard, Ms Jan Procter-King

Abstract

A panel of experts, sponsored by Merck Sharp & Dohme Ltd and Schering-Plough Ltd and
made up of cardiologists, lipidologists, general practitioners and nurses with a special interest in coronary heart disease and lipid management, met recently to debate whether individuals with hyperlipidaemia are being treated to effective levels and, if not, how current and future treatment options could be better employed to reduce cardiovascular risk.

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October 2002 Br J Cardiol 2002;9:549-52 Clinical article

Early thrombolysis for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. Who will provide this treatment in the UK? Part 1

Terry McCormack

Abstract

This article looks at the results of four studies which examined the delivery of early thrombolysis by general practitioners and ambulance paramedics to patients suffering an acute myocardial infarction. The studies found that they could provide early thrombolysis safely.
One study in an isolated rural area in Scotland found general practitioners would have very limited experience of thrombolysis – one case per general practitioner per year – and that use of thrombolysis by local general practitioners fell off sharply after the study. A second study carried out in 15 European countries and Canada, found that there was no significant improvement in mortality and morbidity in the pre-hospital group given thrombolysis at home. This was also found by a Dutch study. An American study using computer-assisted diagnostic ECGs relayed to a physician at the base hospital, found little difference in the pre-hospital and hospital treatment arms but a dramatic improvement in the speed of treatment of both groups. Pre-hospital thrombolysis was also reduced. Two studies found ambulances became ‘tied up’ when thrombolysis was delivered at home.
These studies were used as part of a submission on behalf of the Primary Care Cardiovascular Society to the National Institute for Clinical Excellence. The rest of the submission is discussed in part two of this article next month.

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February 2002 Br J Cardiol 2002;9: Clinical article

Angiotensin II: the greatest serial killer of all time?

Mike Holland

Abstract

This supplement has been sponsored by Merck Sharp & Dohme Limited. It features highlights from a meeting “Changing the course of cardiovascular disease”, which was held in March 2001 in Istanbul and sponsored by Merck Sharp & Dohme Limited.

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