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Tag Archives: ACE inhibitor

August 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:(3) Online First

BCS 2017: spotlight on heart failure

BJC Staff, Dr Richard Crawley, Dr Brian Halliday, Dr Rosita Zakeri

Abstract

Landmark trials in heart failure – 30 years from CONSENSUS With 2017 marking the 30th year since the publication of CONSENSUS,1 which first reported a reduction in mortality with enalapril versus placebo in patients with advanced heart failure (HF), the BCS held a dedicated session to review the seminal clinical trials and advances in chronic heart failure management in this period. Dr Rosita Zakeri (Royal Brompton Hospital, London) reviewed this session for us and spoke to the BJC afterwards. Rosita Zakeri The era of vasodilator therapy for heart failure began in the 1990s. Professor Karl Swedberg (University of Gothenberg, Sweden) began

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March 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:9

NICE quality standard on acute heart failure

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Acute heart failure is a common cause of admission to hospital with over 67,000 admissions in England and Wales a year, and is the leading cause of hospital admission in people 65 years or older in the UK. NICE expects the six quality statements will help improve outcomes from this condition. The six quality statements are: Adults presenting to hospital with new suspected acute heart failure have a single measurement of natriuretic peptide. Adults admitted to hospital with new suspected acute heart failure and raised natriuretic peptide levels have a transthoracic doppler 2D echocardiogram within 48 hours of admission. Adults admitted to hos

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September 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:113–16 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.027

Audit of communication with GPs regarding renal monitoring in CHF patients: are we doing well?

Mohamad Z Kanaan, Julie Bashforth, Abdallah Al-Mohammad

Abstract

Introduction Therapeutic interventions in chronic heart failure (CHF) can lead to renal dysfunction. Combination of the aldosterone antagonist (AA) spironolactone with either angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), reduced mortality and hospitalisation rates and improved the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class in patients recruited into the Randomised Aldactone Evaluation Study (RALES).1 That study showed no statistically significant difference in the incidence of hyperkalaemia between those on AA and those on placebo.1 However, when the results of the trial were implemented int

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