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Tag Archives: cardiac rehabilitation

Low pulse pressure does not reduce the efficacy of a heart failure exercise programme

March 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012; 19 :30–3 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.006

Low pulse pressure does not reduce the efficacy of a heart failure exercise programme

Rosalind Leslie, John P Buckley

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February 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:9-10

BJC prize for innovation in cardiac rehabilitation

BJ Cardio Staff

Abstract

Barbara Conway’s research explored the reasons why people from deprived socio-economic backgrounds access phase 3 cardiac rehabilitation services less than others. She calls these patients the ‘unheard’ in the health service. The study gathered interview data from 10 inhabitants of the five poorest electoral wards in Darlington, aiming to discover common beliefs about the health services which might cause the discrepancy. Some of the findings looked at inhibitors to cardiac rehabilitation with participants saying that they could not see the perceived benefit of cardiac rehabilitation in achieving lifestyle goals. Instead they focused on

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Survey of cardiac rehabilitation across the English Cardiac Networks 2007–2009

February 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:33

Survey of cardiac rehabilitation across the English Cardiac Networks 2007–2009

Muhammad Shahid, Anita Varghese, Abdul Moqsith, James Travis, Andrew Leatherbarrow, Russell I Tipson, Mark Walsh, Linda Binder, E Jane Flint

Abstract

Twenty-eight English Cardiac Networks were surveyed annually from 2007 to 2009 using an email questionnaire to the network coordinators. There was a 100% response rate with the majority showing agreed work plan progress. Only 50% have a lead cardiologist for each programme. Although networks are committed to National Audit of Cardiac Rehabilitation (NACR), data submission remains non-uniform across 61% of networks. National Service Framework (NSF) standards were achieved by 41% in 2007, 47% in 2008 and 50% in 2009. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) post myocardial infarction (MI) guidelines including CR were met by

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Meeting the psychological needs of cardiac patients: an integrated stepped-care approach within a cardiac rehabilitation setting

July 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:175-9

Meeting the psychological needs of cardiac patients: an integrated stepped-care approach within a cardiac rehabilitation setting

Alison Child, Jane Sanders, Paul Sigel, Myra S Hunter

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July 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:181-3

Rehabilitation on the move: teaching cardiac rehabilitation in a novel way

Sher Muhammad, E Jane Flint, Russell I Tipson

Abstract

Introduction Coronary heart disease is a common killer and accounts for approximately 105,000 deaths per year in the UK. Recent research has shown that the most effective strategy, despite the advances in interventional cardiology, is effective secondary prevention and risk factor modification along with a robust rehabilitation programme to improve lifestyle, especially for those who have experienced a coronary event.2 It is also the most cost-effective way of reducing cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Salvaging the acutely ischaemic myocardium with catheter-based interventions without addressing the underlying pathophysiological proces

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November 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16:276-7

Making change happen: the PCCS Annual Scientific Meeting

Colin Doig, Henry Purcell

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Creative solutions Andrew Kenworthy, the chief executive for NHS Nottingham City Primary Care Trust, and an adviser to the PCCS, set the scene for the meeting with his keynote speech on World Class Commissioning. He told delegates that although times were going to be hard in the next few years, he hoped that such financial adversity would lead to creative solutions. In the session that followed, ‘How can we make change happen’, panelist Dr Adrian Brown, a consultant in public health medicine at NHS Westminster, told of two innovative programmes which, along with NHS Health Checks, were helping to transform his area. Westminster has major

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September 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16:211–12

Cardiac rehabilitation: we should all be doing it

Anitha Varghese, Jane Flint

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A reminder The article by Pollard and Sutherland (pages 247–49) reminds us of the importance of such effective treatments as smoking cessation, regular exercise, a balanced diet enriched by fresh fruit but deficient in trans-fats, and a suitable body mass index.2 The author presents findings from a survey conducted on patients offered CR in the light of Department of Health guidelines outlined in the National Service Framework (NSF) for Coronary Heart Disease (2000), and raises several points.3 First, CR has once again been shown to achieve its intended goals. Additionally, it is an extremely popular intervention among patients, with nearly

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September 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16:247–9

Cardiac rehabilitation: are we putting our hearts into it?

Michael Pollard, Caroline Sutherland

Abstract

Introduction Cardiac rehabilitation aims to address all modifiable behavioural risk factors that are susceptible to intervention, including smoking, exercise, diet and weight.1,2 Since less than half of eligible patients attended the out-patient-based cardiac rehabilitation programme at St George’s Hospital, we wanted to establish whether our service was beneficial and popular with patients, and what features might persuade others to participate. This evidence would enable us to improve our service and increase attendance, thereby reducing the risk of further cardiac events, with consequent benefits to patients, their families and healthcar

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September 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16:250–53

Predicting adherence to phase III cardiac rehabilitation: should we be more optimistic?

Lesley A O’Brien, Morag K Thow, Danny Rafferty

Abstract

Introduction Figure 1. The five stages of the transtheoretical model (adapted from ref. 8) Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is embedded in cardiac care and can reduce cardiovascular mortality by 30% and death from all causes by 20–25%.1,2 Phase III CR is the stage of the patient journey in the UK that is primarily delivered in a hospital setting.3 It is acknowledged that strategies to increase adherence and participation are needed to maximise health gains from participation in CR.3 Predicting uptake and adherence has, to date, focused on traditional measures, e.g. age.3 New aspects are receiving some attention, these include disp

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March 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16:57–9

Improving the uptake of cardiac rehabilitation – redesign the service or rewrite the invitation?

Sultan Mosleh, Neil Campbell, Alice Kiger

Abstract

Numerous studies have demonstrated and explored the complex factors associated with low attendance at cardiac rehabilitation. Non-participants tend to be older, female, and more socially deprived, and to live further from the rehabilitation centre.11-13 Organisational factors comprise part of the reason for this. Unsurprisingly, access problems, including long travelling distances, poor public transport and poor parking facilities, discourage participation.14 Women and older people may be less likely to be invited or encouraged to take part. The task of organising programmes, to ensure that everyone eligible is invited and places are availabl

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