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Tag Archives: cardiac rehabilitation

September 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16:250–53

Predicting adherence to phase III cardiac rehabilitation: should we be more optimistic?

Lesley A O’Brien, Morag K Thow, Danny Rafferty

Abstract

Introduction Figure 1. The five stages of the transtheoretical model (adapted from ref. 8) Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is embedded in cardiac care and can reduce cardiovascular mortality by 30% and death from all causes by 20–25%.1,2 Phase III CR is the stage of the patient journey in the UK that is primarily delivered in a hospital setting.3 It is acknowledged that strategies to increase adherence and participation are needed to maximise health gains from participation in CR.3 Predicting uptake and adherence has, to date, focused on traditional measures, e.g. age.3 New aspects are receiving some attention, these include disp

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March 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16:57–9

Improving the uptake of cardiac rehabilitation – redesign the service or rewrite the invitation?

Sultan Mosleh, Neil Campbell, Alice Kiger

Abstract

Numerous studies have demonstrated and explored the complex factors associated with low attendance at cardiac rehabilitation. Non-participants tend to be older, female, and more socially deprived, and to live further from the rehabilitation centre.11-13 Organisational factors comprise part of the reason for this. Unsurprisingly, access problems, including long travelling distances, poor public transport and poor parking facilities, discourage participation.14 Women and older people may be less likely to be invited or encouraged to take part. The task of organising programmes, to ensure that everyone eligible is invited and places are availabl

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March 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16:73-77

Long-term benefits of cardiac rehabilitation: a five-year follow-up of community-based phase 4 programmes

Katherine A Willmer, Mandy Waite

Abstract

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May 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:161–65

The relationship between BNP and risk assessment in cardiac rehabilitation patients

Hugh J N Bethell, Jason D Glover, Julia A Evans, Sally C Turner, Raj L Mehta, Mark A Mullee

Abstract

Introduction Risk stratification is important in the assessment of cardiac patients enrolled in physical training programmes to ensure that these patients receive the appropriate levels of surveillance and exercise intensity. Risk levels, an estimate of the likelihood of future cardiac events, are indicated as low, moderate or high. Poor left ventricular (LV) function is the most important risk factor for death.1,2 The gold standard for assessing LV function is echocardiography but this is expensive and is often not available to cardiac rehabilitation co-ordinators. The additional information provided by plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP

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September 2007 Br J Cardiol 2007;14:203-04

Women and heart disease

Dr Alan Begg

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May 2007 Br J Cardiol 2007;14:175-78

Clinical trials versus the real world: the example of cardiac rehabilitation

Rod S Taylor, Hugh JN Bethell, David A Brodie

Abstract

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March 2007 Br J Cardiol 2007;14:106-108

Hospital anxiety and depression in myocardial infarction patients

Joy McCulloch

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January 2007 Br J Cardiol 2007;14:45-48

A comparison of once- versus twice-weekly supervised phase III cardiac rehabilitation

Helen J Arnold, Louise Sewell, Sally J Singh

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January 2006 Br J Cardiol 2006;13:53-5

National survey of the level of nursing involvement and perceived skills and attributes required in cardiac rehabilitation delivery

Morag K Thow, Danny Rafferty, Janet Mckay

Abstract

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September 2005 Br J Cardiol 2005;12:372-8

Problems of cardiac rehabilitation coordinators in the UK: are perceptions justified by facts?

Hugh JN Bethell, Julia Evans, Sheila Malone, Sally C Turner

Abstract

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