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Tag Archives: COVID-19

June 2020

COVID-19 and diabetes

BJC Staff

Abstract

An international faculty of eminent representatives from primary and specialist care have developed a consensus document on the management of diabetes for people at risk of, or with confirmed COVID-19, for use in both primary and secondary care. Published in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology,1 the brief practical recommendations are based on queries seen to be important by clinicians, questions that have been raised by colleagues and social media, and recommendations guided by using focused-literature review. Clinical decision making in the management of diabetes is already complex and in normal circumstances clinicians follow standard gu

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June 2020

COVID-19 and cardiac rhythm management

BJC Staff

Abstract

They explain how the faculty aim to draw parallels on hospital responses during the COVID-19 crisis, assess how treating patients in cardiology has been during this period, and how cardiologists will continue to operate in what will be the new ‘normal’. Other articles in this bulletin: COVID-19 and the heart • A review of the current data on the association of COVID-19 and the heart COVID-19 and intervention • Catheter lab activity and COVID-19: damned if you do and… • Impact of COVID-19 on primary percutaneous coronary intervention centres in the UK: a survey COVID-19 and diabetes • Expert group practical recommendations: manag

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June 2020 doi:10.5837/bjc.2020.019

COVID-19 and cardiac rehabilitation

Professor Susan Dawkes (Edinburgh Napier University / British Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation [BACPR]), Sally Hughes (British Heart Foundation), Professor Simon Ray (British Cardiovascular Society), Dr Simon Nichols (Sheffield Hallam University / BACPR), Sally Hinton (BACPR), Ceri Roberts (North Bristol NHS Trust / BACPR), Dr Tom Butler (University of Chester / BACPR), Dr Hayes Delal (Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust / BACPR), Professor Patrick Docherty (University of York / National Audit of Cardiac Rehabilitation)
With thanks to: Richard Forsyth (British Heart Foundation), Professor Rod Taylor (University of Glasgow), Professor Lis Neubeck (Edinburgh Napier University), Dr Scott Murray (Wirral University Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust/ BACPR), Gill Farthing (Hampshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust / BACPR), Simone Meldrum (West Suffolk Community Cardiac Rehabilitation / BACPR), Tracy Kitto (East London NHS Foundation Trust / BACPR), Ruby Miller (Cwm Taf Morgannwg University Health Board / BACPR), Alison Allen (Prince Charles Hospital / BACPR)

Abstract

“The COVID-19 pandemic is arguably one of the greatest public health challenges of our time, however, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the most common global cause of morbidity and mortality with over 18 million deaths per year. Understandably, hospitals have postponed non-critical services so that healthcare professionals can be deployed to areas dealing with patients who have the COVID-19 virus. However, there remains an ongoing need to assess, support and rehabilitate those who have CVD or are newly diagnosed with it to prevent the significant risk of unintended, yet significant consequences in the long-term. The consequence of withd

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June 2020

COVID-19 and smartphone apps

Madeleine Oliver

Abstract

Table 1. Where to find the apps Microguide Apple AppStore: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/microguide/id447171786 Google Play Store: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.xancu.utreat&hl=en_GB UpToDate Apple App Store: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/uptodate/id334265345 Google Play Store: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.uptodate.android&hl=en_GB Timed Walk Apple AppStore: https://apps.apple.com/app/id1515893887 GooglePlayStore: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=se.mau.iotap.timedwalkapp Nye Health Apple App Store: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/nye-health/id1439306034 Google Play

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June 2020

Webinar: Restarting cardiology services in the COVID-19 era

Dr Emmanuel Ako, Dr Derek Connolly, Dr Sukhjinder Nijjer, Mr Keith Pearce, Professor Simon Ray, Dr Afsana Safa

Abstract

Podcast of our webinar: Restarting cardiology services in the COVID-19 era This webinar took place on Thursday 18th June 2020. Watch our panel of experts discuss how we can start to optimally deliver key services as the pandemic eases, as well as answer questions from the webinar participants. Learning objectives A review of the challenges of restarting services How we can restart elective cardiac catheter lab services The practicalities in restarting cardiac diagnostic services How new technologies can assist in restarting cardiology outpatient services Is it for me? This webinar is aimed at all grades of health care professionals treatin

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May 2020

Webinar: Cross-specialty service delivery – lessons from the COVID-19 pandemic

Professor Indranil Dasgupta, Professor Philip Kalra, Dr Barbara McGowan, Dr Lara Mitchell, Professor Simon Ray, Dr Kevin Fernando, Professor Paul Kalra

Abstract

Podcast of our webinar ‘Cross-specialty service delivery – lessons from the COVID-19 pandemic’ This webinar took place on Tuesday 2nd June 2020. Watch our panel of experts dicuss how the UK has adapted to new forms of service delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic and how this may help improve future patient care. Programme and faculty 00:00:28 Introduction by webinar moderator: Professor Philip Kalra Professor Kalra is a Consultant Nephrologist at Salford Royal NHS Hospital Trust, and Professor of Renal Medicine at the University of Manchester. 00:04:35 Can lessons from service delivery during COVID-19 help improve long-t

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May 2020

COVID-19 bulletin 2: clinical practice in the pandemic

BJC Staff

Abstract

This Bulletin features news, commentaries and tips from frontline healthcare professionals treating COVID-19 patients daily and other specialists. Do let us know what you think. COVID-19 and immunology vaccine development expert report on COVID-19 and immunology research COVID-19 and primary care a review of current telemedicine platforms COVID-19 and cardiorenal disease COVID-19 and diabetes Diabetes UK position statement COVID-19 diagnostic glucose/lactate sensor in development COVID-19 and mental health COVID-19 and heart valve disease

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May 2020 Br J Cardiol 2020;27:47–8 doi:10.5837/bjc.2020.015

COVID-19 and immunology

Anthony Rees, BJC Staff

Abstract

Professor Anthony Rees writes about the hurdles to overcome in COVID-19 vaccine development At the time of writing there are more than 120 proposed vaccine approaches, seven of which are in clinical trial (Phase 1 or Phase1/2) and 70 or so in preclinical evaluation.1 Of those in clinical studies: two encode vectors where the surface S-protein of COVID-19 is incorporated into a non-replicating chimpanzee adenovirus vector (China and UK) two use a conventional inactivated whole virus (both China) two employ a messenger RNA vector encoding the S-protein (China and USA) one is a DNA vaccine (USA). The time frames for each of these clinical tria

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May 2020

COVID-19 and primary care

Madeleine Oliver, BJC Staff

Abstract

Telemedicine platforms: Madeleine Oliver reviews their strengths, weaknesses and opportunities In the face of COVID-19, primary care has had to adapt at an incredible pace. With lockdown and social distancing measures in place, face-to-face GP consultations have had to be replaced by new forms of socially distanced care. Recent developments in technologies, such as video calling, mean that there is greater scope in what GPs can achieve remotely. Consultation platforms This crisis and the need it has created for telemedicine platforms has meant that many existing platforms are expanding their capabilities. An example of such a platform is Accu

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May 2020

COVID-19 and cardiorenal medicine

BJC Staff

Abstract

Notably work conducted by nephrologist Dr Daniel Batlle, (Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Chicago, Illinois) and co-authors,1 who – having reviewed two recent studies from China – hypothesise it is conceivable that the hypercoagulable state that appears to be a characteristic complication of severe COVID-19 could, in some cases, foster the evolution of acute tubular necrosis to cortical necrosis and, therefore, irreversible kidney failure. The effects of coronavirus on the kidneys are also reviewed in a comprehensive editorial in Kidney International2 which suggests, that altho

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