This website is intended for UK healthcare professionals only Log in | Register

Tag Archives: sacubitril/valsartan

Clinical evidence to support the use of sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696)

June 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23(suppl 1):S1–S16 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.s01

Clinical evidence to support the use of sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696)

Pierpaolo Pellicori, Andrew L Clark

Abstract

The evidence in heart failure and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction PARADIGM-HF1 was a double-blind, randomised-controlled trial in which 8,442 patients with chronic symptomatic heart failure (New York Heart Association [NYHA] class II–IV) and a reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <40% (changed to ≤35% during the course of the study) were randomised to receive enalapril (10 mg twice daily) or sacubitril/valsartan (200 mg twice daily)*. Entry criteria also included a raised natriuretic peptide (NP) level (brain natriuretic peptide [BNP] ≥150 pg/ml or N-terminal proBNP [NTproBNP] ≥600 pg/ml, although for patien

| Full text
The use of sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696) in clinical practice

June 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23(suppl 1):S1–S16 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.s01

The use of sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696) in clinical practice

John McMurray

Abstract

Introduction A patient who seems to be doing well on conventional treatment will naturally be surprised and probably discomforted by the suggestion that his or her treatment should be changed, especially if this means an extra visit or two to the doctor or nurse, along with blood pressure checks and the taking of blood samples (and maybe the doctor or nurse looking after the patient might have similar thoughts!). Of course, those familiar with heart failure will know that the idea that a patient with heart failure is ‘doing well’ (or is ‘stable’) is a myth and that there is a high rate of disease progression, even with the currently b

| Full text
A comment from primary care

June 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23(suppl 1):S1–S16 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.s01

A comment from primary care

Yassir Javaid

Abstract

Introduction Heart failure, if left untreated, has a worse prognosis than the majority of cancers. Yet with the best possible treatment − most of which can and possibly should be delivered in primary care − the one-year mortality can be as low as 10%. Earlier articles in this supplement have described how beta blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) offer significant incremental survival benefits to patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFREF) that can be further augmented by device therapy. Consider: an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) in

| Full text

June 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:51

New ESC heart failure guidelines

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

The 2016 guidelines include for the first time the new drug sacubitril/valsartan (previously known as LCZ696). This is the first drug in the class of angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitors (ARNIs) and was shown in the PARADIGM-HF trial to be superior to the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor enalapril for reducing the risk of death and hospitalisation in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFREF) who met strict inclusion and exclusion criteria. Professor Piotr Ponikowski (Chairperson of the ESC Guidelines Task Force), said: “The issue of how to include LCZ696 in the treatment algorithm generated a lot

| Full text

June 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:51

NICE go-ahead for sacubitril/valsartan

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Sacubitril/valsartan is the first of a new kind of drug called angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitors. NICE recognised sacubitril/valsartan as an innovative treatment, which it says “offers the potential to prevent deaths and reduce the more than 30,000 hospital admissions for this condition each year in England”.  It is the first non-cancer drug to be fast-tracked through the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency’s Early Access to Medicines Scheme. The scheme aims to give patients with life threatening or seriously debilitating conditions access to medicines before they are licensed where there is a clear, unmet medi

| Full text
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to print this page.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to download PDF's.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now