This website is intended for UK healthcare professionals only Log in | Register

Tag Archives: type 2 diabetes

June 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:61

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Nanoparticles, inhaled from sources such as vehicle exhausts, have been shown to cross from the lungs into the blood stream. They can then accumulate in areas susceptible to heart problems, according to research part-funded by the British Heart Foundation.  Previous studies have identified a correlation but not a causal link between nanoparticles and strokes or cardiovascular disease. It is not currently possible to measure environmental nanoparticles in the blood. So, researchers from the University of Edinburgh, and the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment in the Netherlands, used a variety of specialist techniques to t

| Full text
In brief

June 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:56

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

ESC backs regulations for medical devices The European Society of Cardiology has said in a position paper that it welcomes the European Commission’s (EC) proposals for a new Regulation to govern the evaluation and approval of medical devices in Europe as an important step towards improving patient safety. The EC proposal document is available at http://ec.europa.eu/health/medical-devices/documents/revision/index_en.htm New risk analysis scoring system A new risk scoring system, based on the SMART study, allows doctors to determine more accurately the risk of cardiovascular disease patients developing a new event, such as heart attack or str

| Full text

August 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:107–10

Lancet highlights damage of physical inactivity

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

“It’s no coincidence that we’re publishing the series at a time when the country and much of the world is gripped with Olympic fever,” stated Dr Pamela Das, executive editor of the Lancet, at a press conference. One paper reported that 9.4% of deaths from any cause are attributable to physical inactivity. Although the host nation of the Olympics, the UK came out particularly badly in the research. In terms of coronary heart disease, lack of exercise was said to account for 5.8% of cases worldwide, but this rises to 10.5% in the UK. If everyone were to engage in just a modest level of physical activity, this would translate into a gain

| Full text
Drugs for diabetes: part 8 SGLT2 inhibitors

March 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:26–9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.005

Drugs for diabetes: part 8 SGLT2 inhibitors

Alison MacEwen, Gerard A McKay, Miles Fisher

Abstract

Introduction Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for developing both microvascular (retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy) and macrovascular complications (coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease and peripheral vascular disease).1 The link between maintaining good glycaemic control and prevention of these complications is well established.2-4 Guidelines recommend a target glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) of 7% or less, but a large number of patients fail to meet this target and, as of yet, no ideal pharmacological blood glucose-lowering agent exists. Existing pharmacological therapies, which have been previously describ

| Full text
Drugs for diabetes: part 6 GLP-1 receptor agonists

August 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:167–69

Drugs for diabetes: part 6 GLP-1 receptor agonists

Claire McDougall, Gerard A McKay, Miles Fisher

Abstract

(more…)

| Full text
Drugs for diabetes: part 5 DPP-4 inhibitors

June 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:130–2

Drugs for diabetes: part 5 DPP-4 inhibitors

Claire McDougall, Gerard A McKay, Miles Fisher

Abstract

Introduction Type 2 diabetes, which is increasing in prevalence, is a major risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although there are a number of pharmacological approaches to the management of type 2 diabetes, a large number of patients fail to reach glycaemic targets and a limited amount of drugs have shown benefit without glycaemic control. Therefore, there is still an unmet need in this therapeutic area. One recent advance in the management of type 2 diabetes has been the development and clinical use of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists.1 The development of the

| Full text
Drugs for diabetes: part 4 acarbose

April 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:78−81

Drugs for diabetes: part 4 acarbose

Ganesan Arungarinathan, Gerard A McKay, Miles Fisher

Abstract

(more…)

| Full text
Drugs for diabetes: part 2 sulphonylureas

November 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:279–82

Drugs for diabetes: part 2 sulphonylureas

Christopher J Smith, Miles Fisher, Gerard A McKay

Abstract

(more…)

| Full text
Drugs for diabetes: part 1 metformin

September 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:231–4

Drugs for diabetes: part 1 metformin

James G Boyle, Gerard A McKay, Miles Fisher

Abstract

(more…)

| Full text

February 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:21

In brief

BJCardio editorial staff

Abstract

Coffee consumption shows CHD benefits in women A meta-analysis of a number of cohorts studies published in the International Journal of Cardiology (2009;137:216-25) demonstrates that habitual coffee consumption may be associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in women. Analysis of data from 21 cohort studies showed that moderate coffee consumption (of up to four cups of coffee per day) were associated with a 18% reduction in risk of CHD in women.  The investigators note that such an effect was unlikely to be caused by chance. Further benefits have been shown from a meta-analysis published in the Archives of Internal Medici

| Full text
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to print this page.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to download PDF's.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now