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Tag Archives: clinical outcome

Spinal cord stimulation for refractory angina: 100 case-experience from the National Refractory Angina Service

July 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:106–9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.025 Online First

Spinal cord stimulation for refractory angina: 100 case-experience from the National Refractory Angina Service

Blandina Gomes, Kamen Valchanov, William Davies, Adam Brown, Peter Schofield

Abstract

Introduction Papworth Hospital NHS Trust, Cambridge Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy has been used for more than four decades in a variety of chronic pain conditions. The introduction of neurostimulation was a logical consequence of the ‘gate-control’ theory published in 1965.1 According to this model, the activation of large afferent nerve fibres inhibits pain input mediated by small fibres into the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. The goal of SCS is to attenuate discomfort by provoking paraesthesia in the same area. The European Society of Cardiology defines refractory angina as a chronic condition characterised by the presence of a

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Support for prescribers to help improve patient adherence to medication

October 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:131–2 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.032 Online First

Support for prescribers to help improve patient adherence to medication

Linda van der Heiden, Joyca Lacroix, Saskia van Dantzig, Aart van Halteren

Abstract

The non-adherence problem Medication adherence is defined as the extent to which a patient acts in accordance with the prescribed interval and dose of a dosing regimen.1 Subsequently, non-adherence means that the patient is not taking all their medication doses as prescribed, jeopardising the clinical outcome. Cardiovascular medications (such as statins, antihypertensives and antithrombotics) remain the most commonly prescribed agents worldwide for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Patients with low adherence rates have a significantly greater risk of sustaining cardiovascular events compared to those wi

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