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Tag Archives: correspondence

February 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:11 Online First

Correspondence: accurate classification of chest pain

Drs Yasmin Ismail, Nathan Manghat, and Mark Hamilton

Abstract

Dear Sirs, Statistical probabilistic reasoning is important in understanding the likelihood of ‘false-positive’ (FP) and ‘false negative’ (FN) results when requesting any diagnostic test. In cohorts with a low prevalence of disease, a significant number of positive results are likely to be FP. Conversely, when the disease has high prevalence, FN results increase. Identification of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) relies on clinical history, examination and electrocardiogram (ECG)/laboratory results. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) define angina as “typical” or “atypical” depend

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February 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:11 Online First

Correspondence: don’t see their heart broken

Mervyn Huston

Abstract

Dear Sirs, There has been much debate regarding the prophylactic prescribing of antibiotics in patients deemed at risk of developing infective endocarditis (IE) as a result of certain dental procedures.1 The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (BSAC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) have produced differing guidelines for dental practitioners, who may decide to accept one particular code entirely, or a modified version based on discussion with local cardiology departments. This culture of debate amongst cardiologists, dentists and patients regarding best interest,

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February 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:11 Online First

Correspondence: mortality due to rheumatic heart disease

Arun Prasad, Sanjeev Kumar, Birendra Kumar Singh

Abstract

Dear Sirs, Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is the most common acquired heart disease in children in many parts of the world, especially in developing countries. The global burden of disease caused by rheumatic fever and RHD currently falls disproportionately on children and young adults living in low-income countries and is responsible for about 233,000 deaths annually. At least 15.6 million people are estimated to be currently affected by RHD, with a significant number of them requiring repeated hospitalisation and often unaffordable heart surgery in the next five to 20 years.1 Primary prevention of acute rheumatic fever is achieved by treatme

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