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Tag Archives: imaging

July 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:105–7 doi:http://doi.org/10.5837/bjc.2017.017 Online First

The age of diagnostic coronary angiography is over

Andrew J M Lewis

Abstract

The problem Diagnostic coronary angiography died some time ago, so why has it still not yet been buried alongside the exploratory laparotomy? The problem is clear: despite over half a century of experience, almost two-thirds of those undergoing elective diagnostic angiograms do not have obstructive coronary artery disease.1 Even in contemporary National Health Service (NHS) cardiac catheter laboratories, non-flow limiting coronary disease or angiographically normal coronary arteries remain common findings. Coronary angiography is now, arguably, the last invasive procedure to be performed with primarily diagnostic intent on this scale. How do

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Incidental findings on imaging: seeing the wood from the trees

July 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:85–6 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.023 Online First

Incidental findings on imaging: seeing the wood from the trees

Sushant Saluja, Pavel Janousek, Khalil Kawafi, Simon G Anderson

Abstract

Emerging evidence In an issue of Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, Xie et al.1 performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to validate the prognostic importance of CAC scoring in non-triggered thoracic CT. The authors of this study performed a meta-analysis of five studies that compared CAC obtained using non-gated CT scans versus gated CT scans. This study demonstrated an excellent correlation between the two techniques with a pooled Cohen κ agreement being 0.89 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.83–0.95). While this is promising, the authors have also highlighted some discrepancy between the two techniques, and this is important to

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Triple-valve infective endocarditis

April 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:65–7 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.015 Online First

Triple-valve infective endocarditis

Azeem S Sheikh, Asma Abdul Sattar, Claire Williams

Abstract

Introduction Figure 1. Chest X-ray (antero-posterior projection) demonstrating a septic lesion (thick arrow) Despite the significant improvements in both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in recent years, infective endocarditis (IE) remains a medical challenge due to poor prognosis and high mortality. IE varies according to the initial clinical manifestations, underlying cardiac disease, micro-organisms involved and the associated complications. Echocardiographically, the majority of patients demonstrate vegetations on a single valve, while demonstration of involvement of two valves occurs much less frequently; triple-valve involvement is

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March 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:7–9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.002

Endocarditis: the complementary roles of CT and echocardiography

Susanna Price

Abstract

The case study in this issue (see pages 46–7) demonstrates a potential use of CT scanning in the diagnosis of a patient with endocarditis. Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated multi-detector cardiac computed tomography (MDCT) scanning has been proposed by many to have potential in the evaluation of endocarditis by demonstration of vegetations, complications (coronary artery occlusion, fistulae) and peripheral embolism.3 The major limitations of the technique include availability, spatial resolution, failure to demonstrate leaflet perforations and lack of haemodynamic information (table 1). Further, CT findings have not been correlated with clinica

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Atrial space-occupying lesions – the role of multi-modality imaging

May 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:148-50

Atrial space-occupying lesions – the role of multi-modality imaging

Sanjay M Banypersad, Matthias Schmitt

Abstract

Case 1 A 49-year-old woman with an unremarkable past medical history presented to her local hospital with irregular palpitations and two syncopal episodes. On both occasions she had regained consciousness without any neurological features, neither as prodrome nor in recovery. Examination revealed a diastolic murmur. Electrocardiogram (ECG) and chest X-ray were normal. A transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed a 2–3 cm mass in a non-dilated left atrium. Her transoesophageal echocardiogram showed the mass to be located close to the right, lower pulmonary vein but suggested the point of attachment to be the posterior wall rather than the a

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