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Tag Archives: LDL-cholesterol

May 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:52

In briefs

BJC Staff

Abstract

Stat tests loaded into the VITROS XT 7600 Moderate alcohol consumption does not protect against stroke Blood pressure and stroke risk increase steadily with increasing alcohol intake, and previous claims that one to two alcoholic drinks a day might protect against stroke are not borne out by new evidence from a genetic study involving 160,000 adults. Studies of East Asian genes, where two common genetic variants strongly affect what people choose to drink, show that alcohol itself directly increases blood pressure and the chances of having a stroke, according to a new study published in The Lancet (doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)31772-0). Researc

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Towards personalised medicine: HEART UK 28th Annual Conference

September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:104

Towards personalised medicine: HEART UK 28th Annual Conference

BJCardio Staff and others

Abstract

FH: improving detection in primary care The launch of the NICE (National Institute of Health and Care Excellence) guidelines for familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) heralded great optimism for improving detection rates in primary care.1 Even with new research showing that FH is more common than previously thought,2  still around 80% of patients are not recognised. Novel detection approaches are clearly needed. Professor Nadeem Qureshi (University of Nottingham) presented preliminary findings from six GP centres taking part in FAMCHOL (Feasibility of Improving Identification of Familial Hypercholesterolaemia in General Practice: Intervention

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August 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:103

News from the European Atherosclerosis Society Congress

BJCardio Staff and others

Abstract

Lowering LDL-cholesterol: we need to do better It is essential that high-risk patients attain the recommended low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol target. As reported at the first late-breaking session, the choice and dose of statin are key factors influencing LDL-cholesterol lowering. In a meta-analysis of the VOYAGER (Individual Patient Data Meta-analysis of Statin Therapy in At-risk Groups: Effects of Rosuvastatin, Atorvastatin and Simvastatin) database of 37 studies of high-intensity statins, 71% of patients treated with rosuvastatin 40 mg achieved at least 50% reduction in LDL-cholesterol levels, compared with 59% for atorvastatin 8

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June 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:51

Correspondence: assessing the clinical benefits of drugs for dyslipidaemia

Gilbert Wagener

Abstract

Assessing the clinical benefits of drugs for dyslipidaemia Dear Sirs, A recent editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine1 highlights several challenging issues in the development of new treatments for lipid disorders. There is now uncertainty regarding the regulatory approach of approving drugs on the basis of favourable lipid effects and evaluating clinical benefit after approval. In numerous trials and several meta-analyses of outcome trials, the reduction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol has been shown to be associated with outcome benefit.2–4 Most of these studies have been performed with statins. The first demonstrat

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News from ACC.14

April 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:56–7 Online First

News from ACC.14

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

HEAT-PPCI: heparin outperforms bivalirudin in primary PCI The major talking point of this year’s American College of Cardiology meeting was without doubt the aptly named HEAT-PPCI trial which generated more heat than has been seen at such conferences for quite some time. The trial acronym stands for How Effective Are Antithrombotic Therapies in Primary PCI (percutaneous coronary intervention), and the study – conducted in the UK under the leadership of Dr Rod Stables (Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital) – compared unfractionated heparin with bivalirudin (Angiomax®, the Medicines Company) in patients with ST-elevation myoca

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News from the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session 2012

May 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:59–61

News from the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session 2012

News from the world of cardiology

Abstract

CORONARY: off-pump and on-pump CABG similar The largest trial ever to compare off-pump and on-pump coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) has shown no difference between the two techniques in terms of the primary composite end point. There were, however, some differences in certain end points, leading to the suggestion that the decision as to which approach to choose could be individualised with each patient. Table 1. Main results from the CORONARY trial The CORONARY trial enrolled 4,752 patients who were randomised to off-pump or on-pump surgery. At 30 days the primary end point – a composite of death, myocardial infraction (MI), kidney fai

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March 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19(Suppl 1):s1-s16

Lipids and CVD: improving practice and clinical outcome

Abstract

This supplement is a report from the inaugural meeting of the Cardiometabolic Forum, jointly organised by the British Journal of Cardiology and HEART UK – The Cholesterol Charity. The meeting was held at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, London, on 24th November 2011. Meeting chairs were Dr Dermot Neely (Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne) for HEART UK, and Dr Henry Purcell (Royal Brompton Hospital, London, and Editor) for BJC. We hope this supplement will provide readers with an independent overview on recent developments in our knowledge of cholesterol metabolism and its implications for clinical practice. Speakers Dermot Neely

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Addressing residual cardiovascular risk: what does the future hold?*

March 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19(Suppl 1):s1-s16 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.s05

Addressing residual cardiovascular risk: what does the future hold?*

John Reckless

Abstract

There is conclusive evidence that lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels with statins reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease events. However, it is also clear that a substantial residual cardiovascular risk persists, despite best treatment efforts.1,2 Some of this residual risk will be determined by modifiable risk factors, such as lipids, hypertension, tobacco use and diabetes. Further reducing apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing atherogenic lipoproteins or increasing atheroprotective lipoproteins, specifically raising high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol,2 are alternative proposed approaches to reducing this risk.

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In brief

August 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:156–7

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

SAPIEN valve positive results Clinicians have achieved successful one-year outcomes in high-risk or inoperable patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement during the first two years since release of the valve (Sapien®, Edwards) commercially, according to results presented at the Euro PCR 2001 meeting in Paris, France. Despite high predicted mortality and multiple co-morbidities in many of these patients, survival at one year was 76% in the 1,038 patients treated as part of Cohort I (first year of commercialisation), and 77% in the 1,269 patients treated as part of Cohort II (second year of commercialisation).  Since November

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November 2004 Br J Cardiol 2004;11:449-54

Statin safety in perspective – maximising the risk:benefit

Marc Evans

Abstract

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