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Pacing supplement: Introduction

October 2018

Pacing supplement: Introduction

Paul Foley

Abstract

Pacing practice has moved on from the start with unipolar pacing and now practice includes implantable defibrillators and cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) for the treatment of heart failure, with parallel developments in remote follow up. Direct His Bundle pacing is now feasible using specially designed guide catheters and a standard pacing lead and appears to have significant benefits with reductions in heart failure hospitalisation, atrial fibrillation and mortality. The supplement also looks at progress in pacemaker and defibrillator lead extraction, as well as the fast evolving field of leadless pacing. We are pleased to provide â€

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Evaluation of a new same-day discharge protocol for simple and complex pacing procedures

August 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:114–8 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.029

Evaluation of a new same-day discharge protocol for simple and complex pacing procedures

Thomas A Nelson, Aaron Bhakta, Justin Lee, Paul J Sheridan, Robert J Bowes, Jonathan Sahu, Nicholas F Kelland

Abstract

Introduction In many centres, patients stay overnight after their pacing procedure. Most would prefer to get home quicker, and reduced length of stay would result in healthcare savings. Various centres have reported high rates of patient satisfaction,1 and significant cost-savings with day-case pacing,2,3 although this practice is not widespread. A recent survey,4 revealed variation in practice across Europe with many centres routinely mandating a one or two night hospital stay. The safety of day-case pacing was described more than 25 years ago.5,6 Since then, the implant rates of both bradycardia (simple) and more complex devices (cardiac re

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October 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:138–142 Online First

News from the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2015

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

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Pacing in patients with congenital heart disease: part 3

March 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:38 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.006

Pacing in patients with congenital heart disease: part 3

Khaled Albouaini, Archana Rao, David Ramsdale

Abstract

Introduction In the first article, we discussed those anomalies that are usually encountered by chance at, or just prior to, implantation; patent foramen ovale/atrial septal defect, Ebstein’s anomaly and ventricular septal defect, and the potential problems that they may provide to the device implanter. In the second article, we discussed the challenge of device implantation in patients with more complex congenital structural cardiac defects, which the operator should be aware of prior to device implantation, including congenitally corrected L-transposition of great arteries, tetralogy of Fallot and tricuspid atresia/univentricular heart. I

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Pacing in patients with congenital heart disease: part 2

November 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:151–3 doi:10.5837/bjc/2013.31

Pacing in patients with congenital heart disease: part 2

Khaled Albouaini, Archana Rao, David Ramsdale

Abstract

Introduction In the previous article, we discussed those anomalies that are usually encountered by chance at, or just prior to, implantation: patent foramen ovale/atrial septal defect, Ebstein’s anomaly and ventricular septal defect, and the potential problems that they may provide to the device implanter. In this and the next article, we will discuss the challenge of device implantation in patients with more complex congenital structural cardiac defects, which the operator should be aware of prior to device implantation. In this paper we include congenitally corrected L-transposition of great arteries (L-TGA), tetralogy of Fallot and tricu

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Pacing in patients with congenital heart disease: part 1

September 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:117–20 doi:10.5837/bjc/2013.028

Pacing in patients with congenital heart disease: part 1

Khaled Albouaini, Archana Rao, David Ramsdale

Abstract

Introduction The vast majority of patients requiring pacemaker or defibrillator implantation have structurally normal hearts and patients with congenital cardiac abnormalities constitute only a small proportion. The latter can be divided into two groups. The first includes those with undiscovered congenital abnormalities, which do not give rise to symptoms or obvious physical signs, such as dextrocardia, persistent left-sided superior vena cava, atrial septal defect and patent foramen ovale. The second group includes those who are known to have structural cardiac abnormalities, such as Ebstein’s anomaly, ventricular septal defect, transposi

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In brief

May 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:117

In brief

BJ Cardio Staff

Abstract

New pocket-sized visualisation tool This new pocket-sized visualisation tool provides ultrasound technology at the point-of-care. Similar in size to a mobile phone and weighing less than one pound, it can give high quality colour images enabling physicians to take a quick look inside the body and detect disease earlier. Vscan™ is marketed by GE Healthcare and has received the CE Mark by the European Union. Heart failure report published A comprehensive review of the quality of heart failure care in England Bridging the quality gap: heart failure, has been published by The Health Foundation. It highlights that prevention is key to imp

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