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Tag Archives: refractory angina

April 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:69–72 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.011

The effect of EECP on functional exercise capacity and symptom burden in refractory angina

Noman Ali, Haqeel A Jamil, Mohammad Waleed, Osama Raheem, Peysh Patel, Paul Sainsbury, Christopher Morley

Abstract

Introduction Angina pectoris is the most common symptomatic manifestation of ischaemic heart disease (IHD), and is usually caused by an imbalance between myocardial oxygen supply and demand. Standard therapy for angina pectoris includes pharmacological agents, such as rate-limiting drugs and vasodilators. When symptoms are not satisfactorily controlled by pharmacotherapy alone, revascularisation via either percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) has been demonstrated to be of benefit in certain circumstances.1,2 While the majority of patients with angina pectoris can be managed successfully using a s

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Spinal cord stimulation for refractory angina: 100 case-experience from the National Refractory Angina Service

July 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:106–9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.025 Online First

Spinal cord stimulation for refractory angina: 100 case-experience from the National Refractory Angina Service

Blandina Gomes, Kamen Valchanov, William Davies, Adam Brown, Peter Schofield

Abstract

Introduction Papworth Hospital NHS Trust, Cambridge Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy has been used for more than four decades in a variety of chronic pain conditions. The introduction of neurostimulation was a logical consequence of the ‘gate-control’ theory published in 1965.1 According to this model, the activation of large afferent nerve fibres inhibits pain input mediated by small fibres into the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. The goal of SCS is to attenuate discomfort by provoking paraesthesia in the same area. The European Society of Cardiology defines refractory angina as a chronic condition characterised by the presence of a

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Management of refractory angina: the importance of winning over both hearts and minds

June 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:45–6 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.018

Management of refractory angina: the importance of winning over both hearts and minds

Christine Wright, Ranil de Silva

Abstract

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June 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:57–60 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.019

The short- and long-term impact of psychotherapy in patients with chronic, refractory angina

Peysh A Patel, Murad Khan, Chia Yau, Simerjit Thapar, Sarah Taylor, Paul A Sainsbury 

Abstract

Introduction Angina results from myocardial ischaemia as a consequence of mismatch between supply and demand.1 Most cases are secondary to atherosclerotic disease of coronary arteries.2 Conventional therapy to manage such patients has relied on pharmacotherapy and revascularisation strategies. Pharmacological options routinely include aspirin, statin, rate-limiting therapy, such as beta blocker or calcium-channel antagonist, and vasodilators, such as isosorbide mononitrate and nicorandil. Revascularisation may be through percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG).3 Chronic, refractory angina constitutes

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July 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:159-60

Lasers vaporised from NICE guideline recommendations for refractory angina 

Christine Wright

Abstract

Recommendations Members of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society have recently issued a position statement on refractory angina (RFA).2 They have produced three recommendations: Collect accurate data on the incidence and prevalence of RFA in Canada To have a clear definition of RFA that reflects recent advancements in pain neuropathophysiology To have joint CCS and Canadian Pain Society (CPS) guidelines. The group are awaiting the results of a publicly funded study looking at the prevalence of angina six months after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). They are also hoping to establish a registry as part of a joint project with the CCS

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September 2006 Br J Cardiol 2006;13:306-8

Optimal treatment for complex coronary artery disease and refractory angina

Christine Wright, Glyn Towlerton, Kim Fox

Abstract

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