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Tag Archives: risk factors

July 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:111–4 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.021 Online First

Hypertension in pregnancy as the most influential risk factor for PPCM

Hawani Sasmaya Prameswari, Triwedya Indra Dewi, Melawati Hasan, Erwan Martanto, Toni M Aprami

Abstract

Introduction Peri-partum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is an idiopathic cardiomyopathy with symptoms and signs of heart failure, secondary to disorders of ventricular systolic function, in late pregnancy or postpartum, where no other cause of heart failure is found. PPCM is one of the main causes of maternal death worldwide. Data in the US show the incidence of PPCM reaches one in 2,500 to 4,000 pregnancies, while data on the incidence in Indonesia are still unknown. Data from the 2012 IDHS (Indonesian Demographic and Health Survey) showed heart failure, including PPCM, as the cause of a high maternal mortality rate in Indonesia reaching 228 per 100,

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Controlled hypertension: a forgotten diagnosis

November 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:127 doi:10.5837/bjc.2017.029

Controlled hypertension: a forgotten diagnosis

Aaron Koshy, Anet Gregory Toms, Sharon Koshy, Raj Mohindra

Abstract

Figure 1. Suggested model for hypertension Clinical significance Controlled hypertension is likely clinically significant. Patients often receive prognostication or treatment upon the basis of a diagnosis of systemic hypertension. This is built upon the assumption that the patient risk profile is determined by a once proven diagnosis of systemic hypertension. However, if patients are successfully treated for their systemic hypertension they may in fact move from a higher risk group towards a lower risk group. This could result in some patients ultimately receiving inappropriate treatments. For example, consider a relatively young male patie

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July 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:163-5

Treat individual risk factors not ‘metabolic syndrome’ 

BJ Cardio Staff

Abstract

The study, published in the May 25, 2010 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, analysed data from the INTERHEART study, a case control study of incident acute MI, to investigate whether the risk of MI associated with the metabolic syndrome is greater than that conferred by its constituent components (such as abdominal obesity, elevated glucose, abnormal lipids, and elevated blood pressure).Results showed that metabolic syndrome was associated with a two- to three-times increased risk of MI, but the same risk was conferred by having either hypertension or diabetes alone.  The authors explain that supporters of the metabo

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September 2007 Br J Cardiol 2007;14:190

REACHing for new heights in disease management

Deepak L Bhatt, P Gabriel Steg

Abstract

In this larger context, the international Reduction of Atherothrombosis for Continued Health (REACH) Registry was launched in order to study outcomes of atherothrombotic disease, risk factors for atherothrombosis, and also current treatment patterns. Already, the REACH Registry has provided insights at a global level.1 For example, under-treatment of common risk factors such as hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, and diabetes was observed in all regions included in the REACH Registry. Obesity, including morbid obesity, was highly prevalent. Multivascular disease – atherothrombosis affecting more than one arterial territory – was present in app

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September 2007 Br J Cardiol 2007;14:215-218

One-year data from the UK arm of the REACH Registry

Jonathan M Morrell, George C Kassianos

Abstract

As with the global results, there was a high use of evidence-based therapies in the UK patients. Despite this, the combined incidence of cardiovascular events at one year (cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke) was high at 4.82%, 4.46% and 4.35% respectively for peripheral arterial disease (PAD), cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and coronary artery disease (CAD). These figures increase markedly when hospitalisations are taken into account, particularly in patients with PAD (18.54%) compared with CVD (8.29%) and CAD (10.07%). Cardiovascular event rates increased significantly with the number of symptomatic locations (p=0.0043), incr

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May 2007 Br J Cardiol 2007;14:153-59

Baseline data from the UK arm of the REACH Registry

Jonathan M Morrell, George C Kassianos For The Reach Registry Investigators

Abstract

No content available

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March 2005 Br J Cardiol 2005;12:149-54

Organising primary prevention: an approach by multifactorial risk score profile

John M Waddell, Caron Neal

Abstract

No content available

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March 2003 Br J Cardiol (Heart Brain) 2003;10:HB 8–HB 14

Vascular dementia

Lawrence J Whalley, Alison D Murray

Abstract

No content available

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League tables, risk assessment and an opportunity to improve standards

September 2002 Br J Cardiol (Acute Interv Cardiol) 2002;9(1):AIC 5–AIC 10

League tables, risk assessment and an opportunity to improve standards

Stephen Westaby

Abstract

No content available

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April 2002 Br J Cardiol 2002;9:

The specialist nurse in coronary heart disease prevention:evidence for effectiveness

Lucy Wright

Abstract

No content available

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