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Tag Archives: service provision

March 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:37 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.011

The clinical and cost impact of implementing NICE guidance on chest pain of recent onset in a DGH

Boyang Liu, Regina Mammen, Waleed Arshad, Paivi Kylli, Arvinder S Kurbaan, Han B Xiao

Abstract

Introduction There are 2.3 million people living with coronary heart disease in the UK, which results in a healthcare burden of 1% of all GP and 40% of all accident and emergency (A&E) visits.1 It is estimated that 20–40% of the general population will experience chest pain during their life. Chest pain caused by coronary artery disease has a potentially poor prognosis, emphasising the importance of prompt and accurate diagnosis. Treatments are available to improve symptoms and prolong life, hence, the need for the development of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines for the diagnosis of chest pain.1 NI

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Planning for end-of-life care in heart failure: experience of two integrated cardiology-palliative care teams

May 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:71–5 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.014

Planning for end-of-life care in heart failure: experience of two integrated cardiology-palliative care teams

Miriam Johnson, Anne Nunn, Tracey Hawkes, Sharon Stockdale, Andrew Daley

Abstract

Introduction Landmark qualitative studies published within the last decade highlighted inequalities in end-of-life care between people with advanced heart failure (HF) and cancer.1-8 A palliative approach and access to specialist palliative care (SPC) services for people with advanced HF is now underlined in national and international policy.9-14 However, those with HF are still more likely to die in hospital in the UK than cancer patients,15 and UK 2010 national audit figures document less than 4% of people with HF referred for palliative care.16 Hospice referral seems higher in the USA and Canada.17,18 We have previously reported retrospect

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March 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16:57–9

Improving the uptake of cardiac rehabilitation – redesign the service or rewrite the invitation?

Sultan Mosleh, Neil Campbell, Alice Kiger

Abstract

Numerous studies have demonstrated and explored the complex factors associated with low attendance at cardiac rehabilitation. Non-participants tend to be older, female, and more socially deprived, and to live further from the rehabilitation centre.11-13 Organisational factors comprise part of the reason for this. Unsurprisingly, access problems, including long travelling distances, poor public transport and poor parking facilities, discourage participation.14 Women and older people may be less likely to be invited or encouraged to take part. The task of organising programmes, to ensure that everyone eligible is invited and places are availabl

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