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Tag Archives: ultrasound

February 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:12

In brief

BJC Staff

Abstract

Non-inferior cardiovascular outcome for DPP-4 inhibitor Results from the CAROLINA cardiovascular outcome study show that the DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin (Trajenta®, Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly) is non-inferior to the sulphonylurea glimepiride in the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk. The study met its primary end point – defined as the non-inferiority of linagliptin versus glimepiride in time to first occurrence of cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction or non-fatal stroke. The study, carried out over six years in 6,033 adults with type 2 diabetes and increased cardiovascular risk or est

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Does hand-held cardiac ultrasound herald the end of the stethoscope?

February 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:(1) doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.001 Online First

Does hand-held cardiac ultrasound herald the end of the stethoscope?

Peter Currie

Abstract

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March 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:8

Correspondence: echocardiography and enlarged cardiothoracic ratio

Nigel I Jowett

Abstract

Echocardiography and enlarged cardiothoracic ratio Dear Sirs, The Guys’ and St Thomas’s echo team are to be congratulated on producing evidence-based advice that could result in a significant reduction in cardiac ultrasound referrals, which may be enhanced if our radiology colleagues are taken on board.1 Many years ago, our echo department was overloaded with requests for studies as a consequence of radiology reports that included the emotive term ‘cardiomegaly’. This expression is, of course, speculative, as enlargement of the ‘cardiac’ shadow may be due to an expiratory radiograph, prominent epicardial fat pads, pericardial effu

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May 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:89

Book review

Dr Han Bin Xiao

Abstract

Ultrasound, like X-ray, has penetrated almost all fields of clinical medicine as a valuable diagnostic tool. Attempts have even been made to use it for therapeutic purposes. Although the history of the development of medical ultrasound has been relatively short, the application of ultrasound in clinical practice is irreplaceable by any other existing technology. Not only is it a feasible technique for the medical profession to use in any field they choose, it is also harmless to patients. Understanding the history of ultrasound in medicine helps those who are interested in comprehending its practical significance and the potential for future

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