Mediterranean diet reduces new-onset diabetes

Br J Cardiol 2010;17:259-63 Leave a comment
Click any image to enlarge
Authors:

Individuals at high cardiovascular risk but without diabetes who followed a Mediterranean diet had half the rate of new-onset diabetes over four years compared with those on a low-fat diet, a new study shows.

Advertisement
Heart failure - BJC Learning programme
For healthcare professionals only

Br-J-Cardiol-2010-17-260

The findings come from a substudy of the PREDIMED (Prevencion con Dieta Mediterranea) trial, currently underway in Spain, to assess the effects of two Mediterranean diets (supplemented with either extra virgin olive oil or mixed nuts), versus a low-fat diet as a control group.

This substudy involved 418 people without diabetes. After a median follow-up of four years, diabetes incidence was 10.1% in the Mediterranean-diet-with-olive-oil group, 11.0% in the Mediterranean-diet-with-nuts group, and 17.9% in the control group. 

The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio of diabetes in the two Mediterranean diet groups was 0.48.

THERE ARE CURRENTLY NO COMMENTS FOR THIS ARTICLE - LEAVE A COMMENT