This website is intended for UK healthcare professionals only Log in | Register

Tag Archives: anticoagulants

Dabigatran improves the efficiency of an elective direct current cardioversion service 

February 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:29–32 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.002 Online First

Dabigatran improves the efficiency of an elective direct current cardioversion service 

Wai Kah Choo, Shona Fraser, Gareth Padfield, Gordon F Rushworth, Charlie Bloe, Peter Forsyth, Stephen J Cross, Stephen J Leslie

Abstract

Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia affecting approximately 1% of the general population, this rises to 18% in those aged 85 years and above.1 The most effective method for correcting persistent AF is direct current cardioversion (DCCV). However, DCCV is associated with an increased risk of thromboembolic events.2 Anticoagulation with warfarin reduces the risk of thromboembolism from approximately 6% to less than 1%.3 The current recommendations advise therapeutic anticoagulation for at least three weeks prior to, and four weeks after cardioversion.4 A nurse-led elective DCCV service at Raigmore Hospital was establish

| Full text

August 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:92-93 Online First

News from EHRA: encouraging news on anticoagulants

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

With the number of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) set to double by 2050, appropriate anticoagulation for this growing condition was highlighted in a special session at the meeting – a ‘State of The Art Lecture’. Professor Stefan H Hohnloser (JW Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany) described how stroke in Europe costs an estimated €38 billion per year, with 20% attributable to AF. Yet a decade ago, around 40% of AF patients did not receive appropriate anticoagulation. Of those receiving therapy, only around 50% of time in therapeutic range (TTR) is seen. With this in mind, novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are non-inferior to

| Full text

June 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:52

New practical guide to new oral anticoagulants from ESC 

News from the world of cardiology

Abstract

The guide, which has been published online in the European Heart Journal and Europace, covers four new oral anticoagulants: dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban (which are all now on the market for AF), and edoxaban, which is included provisionally, as it is not yet approved. The guide notes that: “Both physicians and patients will have to learn how to use these drugs effectively and safely in clinical practice,” and “Many unresolved questions on how to optimally use these drugs in specific clinical situations remain”. It sets out 15 clinical scenarios and gives “as practical answers as possible” for each one. The topics are: Pra

| Full text

November 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:155

Highlights from HRC 2012

Drs Janet McComb, André Ng, Henry Purcell, and Andreas Wolff

Abstract

Stroke risk assessment in AF New insights on stroke risk assessment were provided by Dr Ami Banerjee (University of Birmingham), in a session supported by the Atrial Fibrillation Association. Table 1. CHADS2 score The CHADS2 risk stratification scoring system (table 1) is currently the indicator for the Quality and Outcomes (QoF) framework used to determine whether an atrial fibrillation (AF) patient warrants anticoagulation. It may underestimate risk and those with a score of zero may actually be at substantial stroke risk. He also pointed out that the system has inherent disadvantages. It does not include many of the risk factors for stroke

| Full text

May 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:57

ESC issues position paper on new anticoagulants

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Of the three new drugs, the paper appears to particularly highlight apixaban saying it “is currently the best-documented alternative to both warfarin and aspirin for stroke prevention in a broad population with AF”. It adds that “apixaban has been shown to be superior compared with warfarin concerning the reduction of stroke and mortality in combination with a reduction in major bleeding, with a bleeding risk similar to that of low-dose aspirin, and with better tolerability than both these alternatives, albeit with no reduction in ischaemic stroke compared with warfarin”. The paper says dabigatran 150 mg is also a well-documented alte

| Full text

March 2010 Br J Cardiol 2009;17(Suppl 1):S3-S4

How do antithrombotics work?

Gordon Lowe

Abstract

Mechanisms Figure 1. Platelet-fibrin thrombus in a coronary artery of a patient with acute coronary syndrome The mechanism of action of aspirin differs from that of other antiplatelet agents. Aspirin irreversibly acetylates platelet cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), completely inhibiting COX-1- dependent synthesis of thromboxane A2 (TXA2), a substance which is a potent vasoconstrictor and promoter of platelet aggregation. Whether low-dose aspirin also exerts a significant anti-inflammatory effect is uncertain: a retrospective sub-analysis suggested that it was more effective in primary prevention in individuals who had high levels of C-reacti

| Full text
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to print this page.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to download PDF's.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now