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Tag Archives: atypical chest pain

Atypical chest pain in young adult patients: dropped shoulder syndrome as a cause

October 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:159 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.036 Online First

Atypical chest pain in young adult patients: dropped shoulder syndrome as a cause

Ali Abdul-Latif, Adnan Shakir

Abstract

Introduction Atypical or non-anginal chest pain (ACP) is any chest pain that has no cardiac cause. ACP is a common clinical condition encountered in everyday cardiology practice and constitutes about half of the cases of chest pain presented to emergency departments.1-5 Figure 1. X-ray showing dropped shoulder syndrome in an 18-year-old woman The causes of this complaint are varied, and controversial aetiologies (musculoskeletal, neurological, psychological, mediastinal, pulmonary and gastrointestinal) have been suggested.3,4,6-9 ACP may result from cervical root compression, which can be confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings

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Eliminate non-cardiac chest pain

March 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:40 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.009

Eliminate non-cardiac chest pain

Richard A Best

Abstract

Findings on examination I looked at 75 consecutive referrals to a chest pain clinic; I noted the following distinguishing features. For angina: Predictable on exertion. Goes with rest. Rarely at rest. Same as previous proved ischaemic discomfort. Mechanical: Effected by movement or inspiration. Reproduced by movement, pressure or percussion on examination. Can last hours or days. Located to a specific structure or nerve root distribution. Could be severe and prolonged with normal electrocardiogram (ECG)/troponin. The most important finding on examination was reproduction of the symptoms by using passive movements of the cervical or thorac

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