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Tag Archives: B-type natriuretic peptide

July 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:179–80

Cost-effectiveness and use of natriuretic peptides in clinical practice – do we have enough evidence yet?

Ahmet Fuat

Abstract

A recent survey of primary care trusts (PCTs) in England found that only 26% currently offered or had previously offered natriuretic peptides for use in primary care.4 Clinicians and healthcare purchasers (PCTs in the UK) still harbour concerns about appropriate cut-offs, the extra cost of BNP/NT proBNP assays, which assay to use (BNP or NT proBNP/point-of-care or laboratory assay), lack of expedient referral pathways for patients with a raised BNP/NT proBNP level and absence of cost-benefit/effectiveness data from a prospective primary care study. Landmark studies such as the Hillingdon heart failure study5 confirmed the high negative predic

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July 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:199-204–6

Cost-consequences analysis of natriuretic peptide assays to refute symptomatic heart failure in primary care

Michael A Scott, Christopher P Price, Martin R Cowie, Martin J Buxton

Abstract

Introduction Heart failure is a serious syndrome accounting for around 4% of UK general practitioner (GP) consultations in patients over 45 years.1 Diagnosis is complex with frequent co-existing symptoms; misdiagnosis may lead to inappropriate treatment and inefficient use of scarce healthcare resources.2 The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines for chronic heart failure state that the 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and/or natriuretic peptides tests (where available) may be used to help exclude heart failure.3 Abnormal ECGs are usually observed in heart failure cases, although in one study, around 20% of pa

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May 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:161–65

The relationship between BNP and risk assessment in cardiac rehabilitation patients

Hugh J N Bethell, Jason D Glover, Julia A Evans, Sally C Turner, Raj L Mehta, Mark A Mullee

Abstract

Introduction Risk stratification is important in the assessment of cardiac patients enrolled in physical training programmes to ensure that these patients receive the appropriate levels of surveillance and exercise intensity. Risk levels, an estimate of the likelihood of future cardiac events, are indicated as low, moderate or high. Poor left ventricular (LV) function is the most important risk factor for death.1,2 The gold standard for assessing LV function is echocardiography but this is expensive and is often not available to cardiac rehabilitation co-ordinators. The additional information provided by plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP

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