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Cardiovascular research 2018 handbook: <br>Useful organisations

September 2018 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.s11

Cardiovascular research 2018 handbook:
Useful organisations

Abstract

British Heart Foundation The biggest independent funder of cardiovascular research in the UK, The British Heart Foundation plays a leading role in the fight against diseases of the heart and circulation by support of vital, pioneering research into their causes, prevention, diagnosis and treatment through research grants. It funds around £100 million of heart research every year. https://www.bhf.org.uk/research/information-for-researchers British Cardiovascular Society/BJCA The British Cardiovascular Society is a registered charity that aims to support and represents those working in cardiovascular care and research, by providing access to t

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November 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:132

BJC young cardiologists panel

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Coronary artery disease In the section on coronary artery disease we have Dr Satpal Arri, who is BHF Clinical Research Fellow and Cardiology SpR South Thames Rotation, Dr Tiffany Patterson, who is BCIS Trainee Representative and BHF Clinical Research Fellow, Cardiology SpR, Kings College, London and Dr Kully Sandhu, who is Cardiology Interventional Trainee, Royal Stoke University Hospital, West Midlands Deanery. Dr Satpal Arri (South Thames Rotation) Dr Jubin Joseph (St Thomas’ Hospital, London) Dr Kully Sandhu (Royal Stoke University Hospital) Dr Tiffany Patterson (Kings College London) Cardiac electrophysiology In this section we have

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In brief

September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:99

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

BSH Parliament day Professor Andrew Clark (President of the British Society for Heart Failure) is pictured here (centre) carrying out an echocardiogram in the House of Commons. He was at a BSH event to help raise awareness that a person diagnosed with heart failure is likely to have a worse prognosis than if they were diagnosed with most cancers. This is despite the availability of specialist heart failure services that can have a remarkable impact on a patient’s chance of survival, but for which there is inconsistent access over the UK leading to wide variations in care and outcomes. Over 60 MPs, Peers, and professional and patient groups

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2012 BJCA trainee survey

February 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:8-9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.001 Online First

2012 BJCA trainee survey

Niall G Keenan

Abstract

Response rate and working hours Although typical of similar surveys, the response rate was disappointingly poor at 35% (261 of a total of 745 trainees enrolled with the Joint Royal Colleges Physicians Training Board [JRCPTB]). This limits, partially, the conclusions that can be drawn from the data as the sample may not be representative. However, given that important workforce planning decisions are made from these data, trainees should be strongly encouraged to take part, and it has even been suggested that the survey should be made compulsory through the Annual Review of Clinical Performance (ARCP) process. A majority (66%) of respondents s

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May 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:134–6

2007 BJCA survey of cardiology trainees

BJCardio editorial team

Abstract

Demographics Figure 1. Primary place of work In line with previous years, the proportion of female trainees was 19%. The average age of trainees was 33 years with an even spread of training years represented. The new specialty registrar (StR) grade accounted for only 7% of respondents, a proportion that will increase year on year. Almost two thirds (66%) are married, and over two thirds of those have children. Of note, 92% of respondents’ partners work full-time in the National Health Service (NHS), a figure that has significant implications for NHS child-care provision. Nevertheless, only 7% intend to train flexibly. A higher proportion th

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