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Tag Archives: cardiology

Manage frailty effectively or manage decline – your choice and responsibility!

January 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26(1) doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.001 Online First

Manage frailty effectively or manage decline – your choice and responsibility!

Srikanth Bellary, Alan J Sinclair

Abstract

Frailty is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and, while the precise pathophysiological mechanisms linking frailty and CVD remain to be elucidated, it is likely that this association is bi-directional.4,6,7 Loss of muscle mass and function (sarcopaenia), insulin resistance and chronic low-level inflammation observed in the frailty state can predispose to CVD. On the other hand, the presence of CVD can lead to reduced activity, muscle loss and exhaustion, thus, predisposing to frailty. Large cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have shown that those with CVD were up to two to three times more likely to be frail than tho

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CardioTweeters: an analysis of Twitter use by UK cardiologists

August 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:102–6 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.023

CardioTweeters: an analysis of Twitter use by UK cardiologists

Sarah Hudson, Antony French

Abstract

Introduction Twitter is a web-based micro-blogging service that defines itself as “a service for friends, family, and co-workers to communicate and stay connected through the exchange of quick, frequent messages.”1 Messages take the form of ‘Tweets’, which are a maximum of 280 characters long and may include photos, video or links to other websites, and may contain a ‘hashtag’ (e.g. #CardioEd) to help users find particular topics. Anyone can create a free Twitter account, and then start ‘following’ other accounts that they find interesting and, in turn, be ‘followed’ by individuals who are interested in their Tweets. An a

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December 2017

Hyperkalaemia: who gets it, how frequent is it, what do I do and does it matter?

Professor David Wheeler, Dr Colin Doig

Abstract

Hyperkalaemia is often multifactorial in origin and may be seen in chronic kidney disease (CKD), acute kidney injury, heart failure, diabetes, elderly patients and those prescribed renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system (RAAS) antagonists. This important area is often somewhat neglected by healthcare professionals. Left untreated, high potassium increases the risk of mortality in CKD and can also result in increased risk of serious cardiac arrhythmia and other acute complications. Chronically it may result in patients with heart failure having symptom and life-improving treatments withdrawn. New therapies for hyperkalaemia are now coming throu

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Introducing integrated care: potential impact on hospital cardiology clinic workload

June 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:75–7 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.020

Introducing integrated care: potential impact on hospital cardiology clinic workload

Ahmad Khwanda, Kevin O’Gallagher, Madalina Garbi, Stefan Karwatowski, Edward Langford

Abstract

Introduction The increasing burden on healthcare services, combined with effects of austerity, has placed the National Health Service (NHS) under pressure to achieve ever-greater efficiency, while improving the quality of service. An example of the increased demand is that the total number of hospital outpatient appointments in England has increased steadily by more than 3% per annum since 2011.1,2 The government, in the 2010 white paper, set out a redesigned pathway endorsing clinically led services based on more effective dialogue and communication between general practice and secondary care.3 Thus, integration of healthcare services has be

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Patient understanding of frequently used cardiology terminology

March 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:39 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.007

Patient understanding of frequently used cardiology terminology

Jonathan Blackman, Mohammad Sahebjalal

Abstract

Introduction Effective communication is known to improve patient satisfaction,1 and has been correlated with improved health outcomes.2 It is estimated that the medical student learns up to 10,000 new words during the course of their medical degree.3 Doctors frequently employ this new vocabulary in patient consultations, leading to jargon that is potentially misunderstood,4 thus, impairing effective communication. A heavy emphasis is now placed on communication skills at medical school to reduce usage of this type of jargon and use more simplified terms. Patient understanding of commonly used cardiology terminology and doctors’ estimation

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Establishing an aortic stenosis surveillance clinic

November 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:286–9

Establishing an aortic stenosis surveillance clinic

David Turpie, Matthew Maycock, Chiala Crawford, Kathleen Aitken, Marwen Macdonald, Colin Farman, Maimie L P Thompson, Jamie Smith, Stephen J Cross, Stephen J Leslie

Abstract

Criteria for an AS surveillance clinic were developed. Patients who were deemed suitable were identified from existing echocardiographic databases, discharge coding and review of the clinical notes. Patients with AS were identified (n=612). After a review of echocardiographic parameters, 117 patients were considered suitable for technician-led review. Of these, 47 patients (40%) were subsequently discharged from the cardiology clinic. A small proportion of patients are reviewed in the general cardiology clinic for no other reason than asymptomatic mild AS (5% of follow-up appointments). Establishment of a national AS surveillance programme c

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September 2007 Br J Cardiol 2007;14:189

Challenge and change for the BJC

Kim Fox, Terry McCormack, Philip Poole-Wilson, Henry Purcell

Abstract

Those doctors wishing to pursue hospital practice have taken a major hit from Modernising Medical Careers (MMC) where junior doctors ran headlong in to a disastrous training application process, leading to disappointment and uncertainty for many. In primary care there is a new GP Curriculum, a new General Medical Services contract and Pay-for-Performance programmes, which have attracted unprecedented levels of investment into the NHS. There are other, as yet untested, reforms including Practice-Based Commissioning and re-accreditation, looming. Never has it been more important for hospital and family practitioners to establish an integrated s

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January 2006 Br J Cardiol 2006;13:44-6

New perspectives for cardiology from chaos theory

David Kernick

Abstract

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November 2003 Br J Cardiol 2003;10:428-30

Training in cardiology – the next decade

John Greenwood

Abstract

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September 2003 Br J Cardiol 2003;10:329-31

Cardiology and the new GMS contract for GPs

Mike Mead

Abstract

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