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Tag Archives: CETP inhibitors

October 2017

ESC 2017: REVEAL – modest beneficial effects with anacetrapib

BJC Staff

Abstract

Presented in a hotline session by Dr Martin Landray (University of Oxford), the trial’s co-principal investigator, and simultaneously published in the New England Journal of Medicine (https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1706444), this large-scale, placebo-controlled study was carried out on 30,449 patients with cardiovascular disease, who were all receiving lipid-lowering treatment with atorvastatin. Those patients also receiving anacetrapib (100 mg once daily) showed a significant reduction in the primary outcome, the risk of major coronary events (coronary death, myocardial infarction or coronary re-vascularisation) by 9% relative to those pati

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Targeting residual risk: a new approach to treating CVD?

July 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:108–12 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.023

Targeting residual risk: a new approach to treating CVD?

Alan Begg, Iain Findlay

Abstract

Introduction Atherosclerosis is a systemic disease of the large- and medium-sized muscular arteries, which is characterised by endothelial dysfunction, vascular inflammation, and the build up of lipids, cholesterol, calcium, and cellular debris within the intima of the vessel wall. This build up results in plaque formation, vascular remodelling, acute and chronic luminal obstruction, abnormalities of blood flow and diminished oxygen supply to target organs.1 Plaque rupture and thrombosis result in the acute clinical complications of atherosclerosis. The process of atherosclerosis begins early in life and progresses over many decades. Rupture

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The future of CETP inhibition – still to be REVEALed

August 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:104–06 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.022

The future of CETP inhibition – still to be REVEALed

Jonathan Morrell

Abstract

Reducing the residual cardiovascular risk that remains after statin use is a frontline challenge for preventive cardiology. After attention to other modifiable risk factors, further reduction of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels and increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are under particular scrutiny.1,2 The cardioprotective epidemiology of HDL-C is strong and well known, and so it often comes as a shock to health professionals that there is no direct proof that raising HDL-C improves cardiovascular outcomes. Despite this, raising HDL-C remains an attractive potential approach for tackling residual ris

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