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Tag Archives: communication

Improving communication with GPs post-STEMI

November 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:138–40 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.037

Improving communication with GPs post-STEMI

JJ Coughlan, Conor Hickie, Barbara Gorna, Ross Murphy, Peter Crean

Abstract

Introduction Coronary artery disease remains one of the leading causes of death in Ireland,1 the UK,2 and worldwide. Despite advances in management, it is a major source of morbidity and mortality in our healthcare system. Numerous trials (PROVE-IT,3 ISIS-1,4 ISIS-2,5 ISIS-3,6 ISIS-4,7 AIRE,8 CAPRICORN9) have established the prognostic benefits associated with adequate secondary prevention post ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines10 recommend all patients discharged post-STEMI should be offered treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi), beta bloc

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It’s only words…

March 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:20–1

It’s only words…

Michael Norell

Abstract

This article marks a first in the almost 10 year history of The oblique view. Thus far my meanderings have been largely generated by ideas I have attempted to develop into readable (hopefully), entertaining (occasionally), interesting (let’s not push it) and even informative prose (now you’re taking the mickey). Any particular messages or personal themes that I have felt important enough to transmit, are woven into the fabric of the piece; the hope is that they become more palatable if seasoned with a tad of humour and garnished with a dash of tongue-in-cheek. In this issue of the BJC, the editor (my old friend Henry Purcell) thought it m

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Patient understanding of frequently used cardiology terminology

March 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:39 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.007

Patient understanding of frequently used cardiology terminology

Jonathan Blackman, Mohammad Sahebjalal

Abstract

Introduction Effective communication is known to improve patient satisfaction,1 and has been correlated with improved health outcomes.2 It is estimated that the medical student learns up to 10,000 new words during the course of their medical degree.3 Doctors frequently employ this new vocabulary in patient consultations, leading to jargon that is potentially misunderstood,4 thus, impairing effective communication. A heavy emphasis is now placed on communication skills at medical school to reduce usage of this type of jargon and use more simplified terms. Patient understanding of commonly used cardiology terminology and doctors’ estimation

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September 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:215-16

Talking to patients: is it really an art or do we take the history for granted?

Michael Norell

Abstract

Two recent, but completely separate instances, prompted me to produce the paragraphs below. The first was National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidance covering the management of patients with recent onset chest pain. As a cardiologist with more years of experience than I would wish to count, this will, of course, prove to be most helpful in the interpretation of the symptom complex with which our patients present. The second, and probably more pertinent, was a tutorial I was delivering (sic) to a small group of medical students about the clerking of cardiac patients. It dawned on me that the ease with which we chat to

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July 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16:194–6

Achieving preferred place of death – is it possible for patients with chronic heart failure?

Miriam J Johnson, Sharon Parsons, Janet Raw, Anne Williams, Andrew Daley

Abstract

Introduction End-of-life care is now a Department of Health (DoH) priority. Primary care trusts have been charged with ensuring provision of high-quality end-of-life care, utilising enhanced central funding.1 While most people would prefer not to die in hospital, many still do.2 In order to change this situation, clinicians need to establish individual patient’s preferences regarding place of death (PPD) and then work proactively towards their achievement. The DoH is promoting the use of tools to help with this, such as the Gold Standards Framework (GSF), Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) and Preferred Place of Care Plan, all of which are applic

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