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Tag Archives: COVID-19

October 2021 Br J Cardiol 2021;28(4) doi:10.5837/bjc.2021.044 Online First

Analysis of the trend in community prescribing of RAAS inhibitors during the COVID-19 pandemic

Layla Guscoth, Sam Hodgson

Abstract

Introduction From December 2019, SARS-CoV-2, a novel coronavirus, sparked a global pandemic and rapid scientific responses to the new coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) disease. Rapid identification showed the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE-2) as the host receptor for SARS-CoV-2. Given this, concerns were raised that renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitors, such as ACE inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs), which may increase the expression of ACE‑2, could negatively influence COVID-19 outcomes. This led to significant media attention and anxiety about ongoing use of these medications. However, there has bee

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Cardiovascular disease: the state of the nation, and the NHS Long Term Plan

September 2021 Br J Cardiol 2021;28(suppl 2):S3–S6 doi:10.5837/bjc.2021.s06

Cardiovascular disease: the state of the nation, and the NHS Long Term Plan

Shahed Ahmad, Xenophon Kassianides, Simon Thackray

Abstract

A silent pandemic Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the primary cause of death worldwide, with an estimate of nearly 18 million lives lost each year, as figures from the World Health Organisation suggest.1,2 As life-expectancy and industrialisation have increased, a significant epidemiological transition has taken place, leading to a long-standing global pandemic in CVD.3 CVD is an umbrella term including disease states of both the heart and the vessels, and, therefore, has pathological implications and associations with most organs, including brain and kidney. It has a multi-faceted impact, not only in terms of mortality and morbidity but also

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June 2021 Br J Cardiol 2021;28:55 doi:10.5837/bjc.2021.024

ECG changes in hospitalised patients with COVID-19 infection

Mengshi Yuan, Zafraan Zathar, Frantisek Nihaj, Stavros Apostolakis, Fairoz Abdul, Derek Connolly, Chetan Varma, Vinoda Sharma

Abstract

Introduction The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), emerged in Wuhan China and has since spread to over 180 countries.1 It was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) in March 2020. In addition to the common respiratory clinical presentation, COVID-19 is associated with cardiovascular complications, which may contribute to patients’ demise.2 The most common is myocardial injury, indicated by a serum troponin rise, which has also been found to be a reliable indicator of disease severity.3 Cardiac arrhythmia is another common cardiovascular manifestati

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April 2021 Br J Cardiol 2021;28:54 doi:10.5837/bjc.2021.021

The primary prevention implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) during the COVID-19 pandemic

Christopher J Cassidy, Khalid Abozguia, Michael J Brack, Angelic Goode, Grahame K Goode, Alison Seed

Abstract

Introduction During the COVID-19 pandemic, difficult decisions have had to be made about access to a wide range of therapies and procedures. On 17 March 2020, National Health Service (NHS) bodies were instructed to create capacity to manage an expected surge of COVID-19 cases, and this included stopping all elective procedures by 15 April.1 Guidelines for triage of patients left those awaiting a primary prevention implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) in a grey area: a case-by-case decision should be made, but that these procedures could be reasonably delayed.2 It has recently been highlighted that patients awaiting a primary preventio

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March 2021 Br J Cardiol 2021;28:7–10 doi:10.5837/bjc.2021.007

COVID-19: treatments and the potential for cardiotoxicity

Sarah Maria Birkhoelzer, Elena Cowan, Kaushik Guha

Abstract

Introduction SARS-CoV-2 has rapidly become a worldwide health emergency. The declaration by the World Health Organisation (WHO) in March 2020 of a global pandemic has underscored the widespread morbidity and mortality caused by the virus. Concerted efforts by healthcare and research communities are ongoing to establish the efficacy and potency of various pharmacotherapeutics. It has been shown that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) affects multiple organs and has heterogeneous effects on the cardiovascular system. This is also accompanied by enhanced morbidity and mortality in patients with pre-existing cardiovascular disease.1 In urgent e

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January 2021 Br J Cardiol 2021;28:22–5 doi:10.5837/bjc.2021.001

The impact of COVID-19 on cardiology training

Samuel Conway, Ali Kirresh, Alex Stevenson, Mahmood Ahmad

Abstract

Introduction The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has produced a dramatic shift in how we practise medicine, with a large reduction in specialty workload and redistribution of services to provide care for COVID-19 patients. This has necessitated changes in working patterns, clinical commitments and training for junior grades. Those in cardiology training programmes in the UK have experienced a significant loss in training opportunities, due to the loss of specialist outpatient clinics and reduction in procedural work (table 1). Trainees have traded percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for central lines and mechanical ventilat

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Adapting cardiovascular disease care to the ‘new norm’ of the COVID-19 era: same standard, different delivery

December 2020 Br J Cardiol 2020;27(suppl 2):S2–S16 doi:10.5837/bjc2020.s05

Adapting cardiovascular disease care to the ‘new norm’ of the COVID-19 era: same standard, different delivery

Martin R Cowie, Matthew Fay, Jo Jerrome, Abhishek Joshi, Jim Moore, Helen Williams

Abstract

Introduction to the steering committee From left to right: Professor Martin Cowie, Dr Matthew Fay, Ms Jo Jerrome,Dr Abhishek Joshi, Dr Jim Moore, Ms Helen Williams Conflicts of interest The steering committe received speaking and consultation fees from Bayer plc. MRC provides consultancy advice to Abbott, AstraZeneca, Bayer, Boston Scientific, Medtronic, Novartis, Roche Diagnostics and Servier. MF has received speaker honoraria, conference sponsorship, unrestricted educational grants, and/or attended meetings sponsored by AstraZeneca, Bayer, Boehringer Ingelheim, Bristol Myers Squibb, Medtronic, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche, Sanofi-Aventis, and S

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December 2020

Urgent call for more heart failure nurses

BJC Staff

Abstract

The new report Heart failure: a call to action warns that COVID-19 could result in a significant increase in the disease. Up to 40% of people diagnosed with heart failure die within one year. Over 900,000 people in the UK are currently affected by heart failure, with around 200,000 new cases diagnosed each year, at a total annual cost of £2 billion to the NHS. The Alliance for Heart Failure https://allianceforheartfailure.org is a coalition of charities, patient groups, professional bodies and healthcare companies working together to raise the profile of heart failure in Government, the NHS and media.

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October 2020 Br J Cardiol 2020;27:109–11 doi:10.5837/bjc.2020.031

Neprilysin inhibitors and angiotensin(1–7) in COVID-19

Nathalie Esser, Sakeneh Zraika

Abstract

The issue regarding use of RAS blockers in the context of COVID-19 has previously been reviewed.1,2 Most recently, emerging data suggest no harm is associated with use of ACE inhibitors or ARBs in COVID-19.3,4 In this perspective, we discuss a related aspect that was first raised by Acanfora and colleagues,5 namely, the potential benefit of neprilysin inhibitors and their role in modulating levels of RAS components. Similar to the situation for ACE inhibitors and ARBs, it seems there are mixed opinions on the utility of neprilysin inhibitors in COVID-19. In a recent review, it was postulated that increasing neprilysin activity might mitigate

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August 2020

Webinar: Restarting cardiology services in Scotland in the COVID-19 era

Professor Adrian Brady, Professor Hany Eteiba, Professor Chim Lang, Ms Jill Nicholls, Mr Dennis Sandeman, Dr Caroline Scally

Abstract

Video of our webinar: Restarting cardiology services in Scotland in the COVID-19 era This webinar took place on Wednesday 16th September 2020. Watch our panel of experts discuss how we can start to optimally deliver key services in Scotland as the pandemic eases, as well as answer questions from the webinar participants. Learning objectives A review of the challenges of restarting cardiology services in the COVID-19 era Dealing with the backlog of coronary artery disease treatment The practicalities in restarting cardiac rhythm management Assessing new models of remote and self care in heart failure Is it for me? This webinar is aimed at a

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