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Tag Archives: diagnosis

July 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:120 doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.027 Online First

Congenital absence of the right pericardium: managing patients long term

Jenny McKeon, Richard Mansfield, Mark Hamilton, Benjamin J Hudson

Abstract

Case We present a 31-year-old professional golfer with no significant cardiac medical history, who presented to Aberdeen Royal Infirmary in the Summer of 2015. He described palpitations after drinking alcohol the night before. After further investigation he was found to be in atrial fibrillation (AF) with fast ventricular rate (figure 1), and underwent medical cardioversion with bisoprolol and flecainide. His blood results were normal and he was discharged with an outpatient echocardiogram follow-up. Figure 1. 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) showing atrial fibrillation, T-wave inversion II, III, aVf, V5, V6 Transthoracic echocardiogram in Aug

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April 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:97–8 doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.015 Online First

Avoiding needless deaths in aortic stenosis

John B Chambers

Abstract

Professor John B Chambers Introduction Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common type of primary heart valve disease in industrialised countries. Although echocardiography is key for its assessment, the need for surgery is most frequently dictated by symptoms.1 However, the history can be surprisingly elusive, and physicians without specialist competencies in valve disease may miss their onset.2 This is important because the risk of death is approximately 1% per annum without symptoms but 4% in the first three months after the onset of symptoms,3 usually before the patient has time to contact their physician (figure 1). It then rises up to 14%

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What next for troponin? When diagnostic precision muddies the water for the physician

January 2018 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.003 Online First

What next for troponin? When diagnostic precision muddies the water for the physician

Thomas E Kaier

Abstract

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Controlled hypertension: a forgotten diagnosis

November 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:127 doi:10.5837/bjc.2017.029

Controlled hypertension: a forgotten diagnosis

Aaron Koshy, Anet Gregory Toms, Sharon Koshy, Raj Mohindra

Abstract

Figure 1. Suggested model for hypertension Clinical significance Controlled hypertension is likely clinically significant. Patients often receive prognostication or treatment upon the basis of a diagnosis of systemic hypertension. This is built upon the assumption that the patient risk profile is determined by a once proven diagnosis of systemic hypertension. However, if patients are successfully treated for their systemic hypertension they may in fact move from a higher risk group towards a lower risk group. This could result in some patients ultimately receiving inappropriate treatments. For example, consider a relatively young male patie

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The utilisation of ECG in the Emergency Department

October 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:159 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.034 Online First

The utilisation of ECG in the Emergency Department

Simiao Liu, Boyang Liu, Han B Xiao

Abstract

Introduction Electrocardiogram (ECG) is a common investigation carried out in the Emergency Department (ED) and provides important information for both diagnosis and prognosis. In the pre-primary coronary intervention era, ECG had been the key investigation for the prompt diagnosis and management of patients with acute myocardial infarction, particularly those with ST elevation.1-5 Since primary coronary angioplasty became widely available in the UK, patients with typical ST-elevation myocardial infarction are filtered directly to specialist centres by the ambulance service. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients without typical ST elevation

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Do NICE tables overestimate the prevalence of significant CAD?

June 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:75 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.017

Do NICE tables overestimate the prevalence of significant CAD?

Jaffar M Khan, Rowena Harrison, Clare Schnaar, Christopher Dugan, Vuyyuru Ramabala, Edward Langford

Abstract

Introduction There is no universal definition for stable angina, as there is for acute coronary syndrome.1 The diagnosis may be based on clinical history alone or on clinical history supplemented by functional testing, or angiography, or both. Angina pectoris is most often due to obstruction to flow in the epicardial coronary arteries, and the ‘gold-standard’ investigation, to date, to detect this, has been invasive coronary angiography.2 A small proportion of patients may have angina with unobstructed coronary arteries secondary to either microvascular coronary disease or coronary spasm.3 Functional ischaemia is not routinely tested for

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Where has the jugular venous pressure gone?

June 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:49–50 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.014

Where has the jugular venous pressure gone?

David E Ward

Abstract

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March 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19(Suppl 1):s1-s16

Lipids and CVD: improving practice and clinical outcome

Abstract

This supplement is a report from the inaugural meeting of the Cardiometabolic Forum, jointly organised by the British Journal of Cardiology and HEART UK – The Cholesterol Charity. The meeting was held at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, London, on 24th November 2011. Meeting chairs were Dr Dermot Neely (Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne) for HEART UK, and Dr Henry Purcell (Royal Brompton Hospital, London, and Editor) for BJC. We hope this supplement will provide readers with an independent overview on recent developments in our knowledge of cholesterol metabolism and its implications for clinical practice. Speakers Dermot Neely

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How can we improve clinical diagnosis of dyslipidaemia?

March 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19(Suppl 1):s1-s16 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.s02

How can we improve clinical diagnosis of dyslipidaemia?

Dermot Neely

Abstract

Abnormalities in plasma lipoprotein concentrations are found in seven of out every 10 patients with premature coronary disease, with a familial disorder in more than half of these cases, highlighting the importance of accurate diagnosis and scope for early treatment of affected families.1 Clinical assessment, incorporating review of phenotypic features, personal and family history, physical signs and laboratory tests, is fundamental to diagnosis. Table 1. Key tests to exclude secondary causes of dyslipidaemia In the first instance, it is important to exclude secondary causes of dyslipidaemia. Diabetes mellitus, untreated hypothyroidism, neph

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October 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:219–22 doi:10.5837/bjc.2011.002

Patent foramen ovale: diagnosis, indications for closure and complications

Sudhakar George, David Hildick-Smith 

Abstract

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