This website is intended for UK healthcare professionals only Log in | Register

Tag Archives: diet

November 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:136

Cholesterol – a problem solved?

Jaqui Walker

Abstract

Genetic disease The benefits of child-parent screening for familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), were explored by Professor David Wald (Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London). Detection rates are highest if FH is screened for in children between one to two years of age – a heel prick test, for example, is quick to carry out at routine immunisation appointments and uptake rates of 84% have been achieved. Screening is effective – a rate of four children and four parents are identified for every 1,000 children screened. The child benefits twice: their

| Full text

August 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:107–10

Stricter food policies could dramatically cut heart disease deaths

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

The study, published in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization, was conducted by a team led by Dr Martin O’Flaherty (University of Liverpool). They note that although the UK has made modest dietary improvements over the past decade, the current goals are “clearly insufficient longer term”. They point out that Denmark banned trans fats in 2004, and many other countries are now also aggressively working to eliminate them. They say that “voluntary agreements” with the processed food industry generally fail, and that further improvements resembling those attained by other countries are achievable through stricter dietary policies

| Full text

March 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19(Suppl 1):s1-s16

Lipids and CVD: improving practice and clinical outcome

Abstract

This supplement is a report from the inaugural meeting of the Cardiometabolic Forum, jointly organised by the British Journal of Cardiology and HEART UK – The Cholesterol Charity. The meeting was held at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, London, on 24th November 2011. Meeting chairs were Dr Dermot Neely (Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne) for HEART UK, and Dr Henry Purcell (Royal Brompton Hospital, London, and Editor) for BJC. We hope this supplement will provide readers with an independent overview on recent developments in our knowledge of cholesterol metabolism and its implications for clinical practice. Speakers Dermot Neely

| Full text
Improving dyslipidaemia management: focus on lifestyle intervention and adherence

March 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19(Suppl 1):s1-s16 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.s03

Improving dyslipidaemia management: focus on lifestyle intervention and adherence

Adie Viljoen

Abstract

The global epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes, largely due to overconsumption and sedentary lifestyle, is a major challenge facing clinicians. In the UK, as in the European Region, the prevalence of obesity is rapidly increasing, highlighting a growing health challenge.1 In England (2003 data), 65% of males and 55% of females aged 16 years or more are either overweight or obese.1 As a consequence, the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, of which dyslipidaemia (elevated triglycerides and low plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein [HDL] cholesterol) and central obesity are key features,2 is increasing. Therapeutic lifestyle intervent

| Full text

August 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:178

Lifestyle advice and drug therapy post-myocardial infarction: a survey of UK current practice

Julian Halcox, Steven Lindsay, Alan Begg, Kathryn Griffith, Alison Mead, Beverly Barr 

Abstract

Introduction Myocardial infarction (MI) is a common condition, estimated to affect almost 150,000 people per year in the UK.1 Without effective treatment, the immediate mortality of MI approaches 40% with a further 10% of patients dying in the subsequent year.2 In those who survive the initial post-MI period, an increased risk of death from cardiovascular causes (5% per year) persists indefinitely.2 However, effective secondary prevention measures can significantly reduce this risk.3 An estimated 1.4 million people in the UK have had an MI.4 Reducing morbidity and mortality among this group requires effective secondary prevention measures. In

| Full text
Physician heal thyself? Not on your nelly

June 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:115–116

Physician heal thyself? Not on your nelly

Michael Norell

Abstract

It all began on Boxing Day last year. Full of yuletide spirit we had descended upon my brother’s home and, in addition to indulging in a general familial ‘catch up’, we were also appraised about the progress of his wife’s diet. Now the paragraphs ahead are not intended to provide a forum in which to debate the need – or otherwise – of such restraint on her part. I was more struck by the results.  Apparently, her simple avoidance of potatoes, rice, pasta and bread was sufficient to produce an impressive loss of poundage. It sounded to me like a slightly modified Atkins diet (reference available upon request), which switches the me

| Full text

February 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:s13-s5

Foreword

Julian Halcox - Professor of Cardiology and Consultant Cardiologist

Abstract

To address the question of increasing engagement with CR programmes in target areas, in 2009, I chaired a Steering Committee convened by Abbott Healthcare Products Ltd. (formerly Solvay Healthcare) called ‘Setting the Standard for Cardiac Rehabilitation’ (START). The Steering Committee advised that the existing Cardiac Networks in each region would be the best forum for disseminating information about changes in CR funding and standards of care in this field. Abbott Healthcare Products Ltd. kindly agreed to organise a series of meetings in the UK, held during 2009 and early 2010, with the aim of raising awareness of the importance of CR a

| Full text

February 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:s13-s5

Why is cardiac rehabilitation so important?

John Buckley

Abstract

WHO definition The World Health Organization (WHO) defined CR in 1993 in a timeless way that is inclusive and sensitive to the psychosocial, biomedical, professional expertise and service delivery mode and location elements required of a contemporary CR service. “The sum of activities required to influence favourably the underlying cause of the disease so that (people) may by their own efforts preserve, or resume when lost, as normal a place in the community… …it must be integrated within secondary prevention services of which it forms one facet”.3 BACR definition This article reflects on how this definition dovetails with the BACR St

| Full text

February 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:s13-s5

Overview of UK cardiac rehabilitation services: a West Midlands perspective 

Dr E Jane Flint

Abstract

In fact, fewer than half of networks have ever benefited from Patient Choice Revascularisation Pathway monies, which were originally intended to support CR also.2 The START meeting in Birmingham in December 2009 was an opportunity to celebrate the innovative approach undertaken by the West Midlands’ Regional NSF Implementation Group for Cardiac Rehabilitation and Secondary Prevention, describing local CR pathway service standards against which West Midlands’ CR programmes could be audited to inform commissioning. The subsequent proportional allocation of ‘Patient Choice’ rehabilitation funding across Birmingham and the Black Country w

| Full text

February 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:s8-s10

Sharing best practices: a nurse-led cardiac prevention and rehabilitation service

Judith Edwards 

Abstract

The service at Charing Cross was used as the model for EUROACTION, a randomised, controlled trial of a preventive cardiology programme, conducted in eight European countries, including the UK. This nurse-led multidisciplinary programme significantly improved the management of lifestyle and medical risk factors for cardiovascular disease prevention in coronary patients and patients at high multifactorial risk for developing heart disease.1 The principles of the EUROACTION programme were used to found The MyAction community programme, commissioned in 2008 by NHS Westminster as a model for preventive cardiology care for its residents. The Imperi

| Full text
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to print this page.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to download PDF's.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now