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Tag Archives: EXAMINE

In brief

September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:99

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

BSH Parliament day Professor Andrew Clark (President of the British Society for Heart Failure) is pictured here (centre) carrying out an echocardiogram in the House of Commons. He was at a BSH event to help raise awareness that a person diagnosed with heart failure is likely to have a worse prognosis than if they were diagnosed with most cancers. This is despite the availability of specialist heart failure services that can have a remarkable impact on a patient’s chance of survival, but for which there is inconsistent access over the UK leading to wide variations in care and outcomes. Over 60 MPs, Peers, and professional and patient groups

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March 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:16

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

New drugs for diabetes A new DPP-4i for the management of type 2 diabetes, alogliptin (Vipidia®) has been launched by Takeda in the UK following data from EXAMINE, an outcome trial conducted in high risk acute coronary syndrome patients (see Br J Cardiol 2013;4:131) where the drug significantly reduced glucose levels and also demonstrated cardiovascular safety. Alogliptin and the fixed-dose combination product alogliptin and metformin (Vipdomet®) are now available in the UK. Alogliptin is licensed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in adults aged 18 years and older to improve glycaemic control in combination with other glucose-lo

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News from the ESC Congress 2013

October 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:130–2

News from the ESC Congress 2013

BJCardio Staff and others

Abstract

PRAMI: preventive PCI of other lesions beneficial in STEMI Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) have better outcomes if non-culprit lesions are also treated, according to results from the PRAMI (Preventive Angioplasty in Myocardial Infarction Trial) study published recently in the New England Journal of Medicine (http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1305520). In the trial, patients who also had PCI of the non-culprit lesions had a 65% reduction in event rate, driven by reductions in subsequent myocardial infarction (MI) and refractory angina. Presenting the results, Dr David Wa

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