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Tag Archives: heart failure

The SERVE-HF study: investigating the impact of central sleep apnoea on heart failure

April 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:50–1 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.011 Online First

The SERVE-HF study: investigating the impact of central sleep apnoea on heart failure

Martin Cowie

Abstract

An overlooked form of SDB Professor Martin Cowie Another form of sleep apnoea – central sleep apnoea with Cheyne Stokes respiration (CSA-CSR) – has received less in-depth investigation than OSA. Nonetheless, it carries significant importance, particularly in heart failure patients. Moderate-to-severe forms have been reported to occur in up to 50% of chronic heart failure patients.4-7 Unlike OSA patients, whose loud night-time snores are punctuated with dramatic apnoeic episodes, CSA-CSR patients exhibit a different style of breathing. In this patient group, night-time breathing follows a waxing and waning pattern in which successive breat

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Underuse of beta blockers in patients with heart failure

March 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:11–13 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.005

Underuse of beta blockers in patients with heart failure

Laxman Dubey, Paul Kalra, Henry Purcell

Abstract

Our letter from Nepal below shows underuse of beta blockers is a widespread problem As outlined in the recent European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for the treatment of heart failure,1 the pivotal trials with beta blockers were conducted in patients with continuing symptoms and a persistently low ejection fraction (EF), despite treatment with an ACE inhibitor and, in most cases, a diuretic. Despite this, “there is consensus that these treatments are complementary and that a beta blocker and an ACE inhibitor should both be started as soon as possible after diagnosis of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF)”.1

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Acute heart failure – a call to action

March 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 2):S1–S11 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s02

Acute heart failure – a call to action

Professor Martin Cowie, Professor Derek Bell, Mrs Jane Butler, Professor Henry Dargie, Professor Alasdair Gray, Professor Theresa McDonagh, Dr Hugh McIntyre, Professor Iain Squire, Dr Jacqueline Taylor, Ms Helen Williams

Abstract

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News from the BSH 15th Annual Autumn Meeting

February 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:18-9

News from the BSH 15th Annual Autumn Meeting

Abstract

Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists Professor Faiez Zannad (Université de Lorraine, Nancy, France), the first of two guest lecturers, who has been an investigator in three major randomised controlled trials (RCT) of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRA) in heart failure,1-3 opened the first session. There was a particular focus on the recent EMPHASIS-HF trial,3 which recruited heart failure (HF) patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (ejection fraction [EF] ≤30%, or EF 30-35% with QRS duration >130 ms) and mild symptoms (New York Heart Association [NYHA] class II). Eplerenone treatment resulted in a 37% relative

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February 2013 Online First

British Society of Heart Failure Young Investigators’ Award

Abstract

Multipolar left ventricular pacing to optimise acute haemodynamic response to cardiac resynchronisation therapy SY Ahsan (presenting author), B Sabberwal, C Hayward, P Lambiase, M Thomas, GG Babu, S Aggarwal, MD Lowe, AWC Chow The Heart Hospital, Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London Purpose: Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) reduces morbidity and mortality in a sub-group of patients with heart failure, though up to 30% of patients have no benefit. CRT patients are heterogeneous and an individualised approach to CRT may be needed to increase response rate. We evaluated the impact

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News from the 7th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Cardiorenal Forum

December 2012 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:20–1 Online First

News from the 7th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Cardiorenal Forum

Abstract

Introduction As doctors and scientists we are accustomed to breaking down problems and simplifying complex pathology in order to focus our management and identify possible targets for future therapies. The pathophysiology of cardiorenal disease is no different but, as yet, attempts to elucidate the complex interaction between heart and kidneys has failed. Although cardiac and renal disease are often diagnosed together, it is clear that a straightforward causal relationship does not exist. Disease in either serves as a risk factor for disease in the other and perpetuates the progression of that disease, but why this is so is unclear. Whilst th

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In brief

November 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:160

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

First UK operation for HF with nerve-stimulating implant The UK’s first operation to tackle heart failure (HF) with a novel nerve-stimulating device was performed recently at Glenfield Hospital, Leicester. The operation was part of the INOVATE-HF clinical trial, a global investigation to determine the safety and efficacy of the an implantable electrical stimulation device (CardioFit,® BioControl Medical), designed to improve heart function in patients with HF. The study will evaluate the system’s ability to reduce hospitalisation and death among patients with HF, while also exploring whether combined treatment with the system and pres

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August 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:107–10

New ESC Guidelines on heart failure and CVD prevention

News from the world of cardiology

Abstract

Heart failure The recommendations on devices, drugs and diagnosis in heart failure were developed by the ESC in collaboration with a heart failure association of the ESC. There have been several major updates since the previous guidance published in 2008.  The new updates include: In devices, left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have been hailed as a step change in the management of heart failure. LVADs are more reliable and lead to fewer complications than in 2008. Until now, LVADs have been used as a temporary measure in patients awaiting a heart transplant. Professor John McMurray (Glasgow, UK), chairperson of the ESC Clinical Practice

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August 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:116

Optimised beta blocker therapy in heart failure A gap between training and provision: a primary-care based ECG survey

Danny Lim, Dev Katarey; Drs Raj Mohindra, Stuart Russell, and Andreas Wolff

Abstract

Optimised beta blocker therapy in heart failure: is there space for additional heart rate control? Dear Sirs, We undertook a similar audit to Russell et al.1 within the heart failure service of a district general hospital auditing the case notes of 96 patients attending over three months. Applying the SHIFT inclusion and exclusion criteria, we identified only seven patients (6.7%) eligible for ivabradine. Using the SHIFT dataset the number needed to treat to prevent a single hospitalisation due to heart failure was 22.2 Extrapolating our data, over 12 months, we would expect to identify approximately 28 suitable patients. Treating 28 patients

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August 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:144

Book reviews

Abstract

It is predicted that the prevalence of heart failure will continue to rise as more people survive cardiac conditions that not too long ago were deemed fatal, and as clinicians get better at recognising and diagnosing it. This compendium, which has been compiled by experts in the field, serves as an essential reference for anyone who is serious about the topic of heart failure. It provides the information required in a piecemeal fashion without compromising on crucial detail and evidence base, sometimes lacking in other textbooks attempting to condense this broad subject matter. It is presented in an easy to read and uncluttered fashion and th

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