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Tag Archives: HEART UK

August 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:95

HEART UK – Hot topics in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease

Jaqui Walker

Abstract

Professor Klaus Parhofer Lipoprotein (a) The role of lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] was explored by Professor Klaus Parhofer (Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich, Germany). This is an independent risk factor in cardiovascular disease (CVD), with a causal link to atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction (MI), aortic valve stenosis and heart failure. Of the different therapies that can be used to reduce elevated Lp(a), only apheresis shows a reduction in CVD events. Currently, the most important management strategy is to optimise all other CVD risk factors, particularly low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). In patients with progressive CVD, de

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November 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:136

Cholesterol – a problem solved?

Jaqui Walker

Abstract

Genetic disease The benefits of child-parent screening for familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), were explored by Professor David Wald (Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London). Detection rates are highest if FH is screened for in children between one to two years of age – a heel prick test, for example, is quick to carry out at routine immunisation appointments and uptake rates of 84% have been achieved. Screening is effective – a rate of four children and four parents are identified for every 1,000 children screened. The child benefits twice: their

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Cholesterol: the evolving story – HEART UK 30th annual conference

November 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:136

Cholesterol: the evolving story – HEART UK 30th annual conference

Jaqui Walker

Abstract

The first day of the conference focused on hyperlipidaemia in children. In the opening address Professor Albert Wiegman (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands) presented compelling data on the importance of screening and identifying children with familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) so they can be effectively treated and early cardiovascular events prevented. Professor Albert Wiegman (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands) FH is one of the most common genetic disorders in the world. Both heterozygous, and to a greater extent homozygous FH, can be disabling at a young age and shorten life expectancy. Homozygous familial hypercholesterolae

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March 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:9

Confusing NICE guidance on PCSK9 inhibitors

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Jules Payne hopes NICE will ‘see sense’ about the PCSK9 inhibitors In November 2015, NICE published draft guidance not recommending evolocumab as an option for people with high cholesterol (primary hypercholesterolaemia – heterozygous familial and non-familial) and mixed dylipidaemia. A similar decision for alirocumab followed in February 2016, although only a few days before, the earlier decision for evolocumab had been modified by NICE who said that it could be used for a limited number of NHS patients who are considered to be statin intolerant. HEART UK Chief Executive Ms Jules Payne said: “NICE appear to be confused about

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‘Lipids in the community’ – HEART UK 29th annual conference

December 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:145

‘Lipids in the community’ – HEART UK 29th annual conference

Jaqui Walker

Abstract

Detecting undiagnosed familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) in the community and helping families manage the condition before it leads to a cardiovascular disease (CVD) event was one of the key themes of the conference. A second important theme was taking action on the risk factors and behaviours that are linked to CVD and other non-communicable diseases (NCDs). These risk factors and behaviours have been understood for decades, yet the challenges of finding effective ways to help the population change to healthier behaviours, and how to assess and monitor this in clinical practice, remain. Professor Huon Gray, National ClinicalDirector for He

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In brief

October 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:203-206

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

UK cholesterol awareness low Millions of people in the UK hold incorrect beliefs about the risks of cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to HEART UK research. The research, which tested 1,177 people on their knowledge and concerns about high cholesterol, revealed that more than 40% of respondents wrongly thought that raised cholesterol resulted from drinking too much, while almost 60% did not know that the condition can be inherited. Almost half the population have never had a cholesterol check and only 2% of those surveyed named high cholesterol as their biggest health concern. The top health worry for people was cancer, even though CVD i

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August 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:158–9

Old problems, new solutions: the HEART UK annual conference

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Heart hotspots campaign The North/South divide in coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality remains significant despite improvements in cardiovascular disease (CVD) care, according to the ‘Heart Hotspots’ campaign launched at this year’s conference. The North West region has the highest mortality (93.72 per 100,000) versus South Central, which showed the lowest mortality (65.59 people per 100,000), according to NHS Information Centre data highlighted by the campaign (figure 1).1 CHD mortality in Tameside and Glossop, near Manchester, is almost four times as high as for those living in Kensington and Chelsea, London (140.84 vs. 36.91 people

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November 2002 Br J Cardiol 2002;9:570-1

HEART UK – a new charity to help tackle blood fats and vascular disease

John Reckless

Abstract

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