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Tag Archives: heparin

September 2021 Br J Cardiol 2021;28:109–11 doi:10.5837/bjc.2021.039

Heparin-free distal radial artery approach to cardiac catheterisation and the small radial recurrent artery

Pitt O Lim, Ziyad Elghamry

Abstract

Introduction Giving heparin with radial artery access cardiac catheterisation is standard practice to prevent radial artery occlusion (RAO).1,2 However, this is complicated by access-site bleeding in nearly one quarter of cases,2,3 and more significant forearm haematoma approaching a 10% incidence with the 6Fr catheter system.4 The ‘newer’ distal radial artery (dRA) approach, where the radial artery is punctured in the anatomical ‘snuff box’, i.e. beyond the radial artery bifurcation into the palmar arch branches, has significantly less RAO.5 Hence, we have defaulted to the dRA approach in our allcomers’ cardiac catheterisation prac

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News from the 2010 Congress of the European Society of Cardiology

September 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:211-14

News from the 2010 Congress of the European Society of Cardiology

Abstract

Highlights of this year’s European Society of Cardiology Congress, held in Stockholm, Sweden, from August 28th to September 1st included a new drug which benefits heart failure by slowing heart rate, and more exciting results from oral compounds that could replace warfarin in various indications. Highlights of this year’s European Society of Cardiology Congress, held in Stockholm, Sweden, from August 28th to September 1st included a new drug which benefits heart failure by slowing heart rate, and more exciting results from oral compounds that could replace warfarin in various indications. SHIFT: ivabradine shows benefit in heart failure

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March 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:87-94

New anticoagulant strategies in ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with fibrinolytic therapy

Ian B A Menown

Abstract

Introduction Culprit artery reperfusion with fibrinolytic therapy and/or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is the established treatment for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), with rapid access to optimised treatment providing the best outcome.1,2 Although timely primary PCI compared with fibrinolytic therapy for STEMI has demonstrated potential benefits in mortality and morbidity1 and pilot primary PCI services are currently being evaluated around the UK, fibrinolytic therapy remains the most common form of reperfusion treatment. An area of ongoing research is the optimisation of adjuvant treatment, in particular the anticoagu

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March 2006 Br J Cardiol 2006;13:90-8

American College of Cardiology 55th Annual Scientific Session

BJCardio editorial team

Abstract

No content available

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November 2004 Br J Cardiol (Acute Interv Cardiol) 2004;11:AIC 85–AIC 88

Bivalirudin in percutaneous coronary intervention

Daniel J Blackman, Adrian P Banning

Abstract

No content available

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