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Tag Archives: iron

Prevalence, causes, diagnosis and guidelines for treatment

February 2021 Br J Cardiol 2021;28(suppl 1):S3–S6 doi:10.5837/bjc.2021.s01

Prevalence, causes, diagnosis and guidelines for treatment

Mohamed Eltayeb, Vishnu Ashok, Iain Squire

Abstract

Pathophysiology Anaemia is a common comorbidity in heart failure (HF) and is strongly associated with disease severity, prognosis and mortality.1 The pathophysiology behind the high prevalence of anaemia in HF, and its association with adverse outcomes, is complex and multi-factorial.2 Some of the key factors involved include renal impairment, chronic inflammation, medications and haematinic deficiency, in particular iron deficiency (ID).3 ID is typically defined as a serum ferritin level <30 µg/L and transferrin saturation <20%.4 ID has better predictive value in identifying risk of long-term unfavourable outcomes in patients with chr

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News from the 7th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Cardiorenal Forum

December 2012 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:20–1 Online First

News from the 7th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Cardiorenal Forum

Abstract

Introduction As doctors and scientists we are accustomed to breaking down problems and simplifying complex pathology in order to focus our management and identify possible targets for future therapies. The pathophysiology of cardiorenal disease is no different but, as yet, attempts to elucidate the complex interaction between heart and kidneys has failed. Although cardiac and renal disease are often diagnosed together, it is clear that a straightforward causal relationship does not exist. Disease in either serves as a risk factor for disease in the other and perpetuates the progression of that disease, but why this is so is unclear. Whilst th

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