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Tag Archives: peripheral artery disease

Introduction: peripheral artery disease in the UK – unmet needs

March 2020 Br J Cardiol 2020;27(suppl 1):S3 doi:10.5837/bjc2020.s01

Introduction: peripheral artery disease in the UK – unmet needs

Derek Connolly

Abstract

Patients presenting with symptomatic PAD are at high risk of ischaemic stroke, myocardial infarction and progression of the PAD.2 Recent data suggest that half of chronic total occlusions occurring below the knee are thomboembolic in origin, and not due to in situ atherosclerosis as believed previously.3 Accordingly, treating PAD patients with antithrombotic agents may have benefits in reducing major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE).8 The COMPASS (Cardiovascular Outcomes for People Using Anticoagulation Strategies) trial demonstrated that adding rivaroxaban 2.5 mg twice daily to aspirin 100 mg once daily in patients with PAD reduced MACE

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Atherosclerotic peripheral artery disease: the growing challenge to improve life and limb

March 2020 Br J Cardiol 2020;27(suppl 1):S4–S8 doi:10.5837/bjc2020.s02

Atherosclerotic peripheral artery disease: the growing challenge to improve life and limb

Matthew A Popplewell, Owain Fisher, Ruth A Benson, Andrew Garnham

Abstract

Introduction Currently, worldwide, there is an impending epidemic of symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD). This is largely due to the increasing prevalence of risk factors such as: smoking, diabetes, high blood pressure (BP), cholesterol, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In the developed world this is largely due to an epidemic of diabetes and obesity. There is a wide spectrum of PAD that ranges from asymptomatic disease through to chronic limb-threatening ischaemia (CLTI). Depending upon income and region, the number of sufferers with PAD has increased by 13–25% during the last decade, accounting for 202 million people worldwide

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Peripheral artery disease: current diagnosis and management

March 2020 Br J Cardiol 2020;27(suppl 1):S9–S14 doi:10.5837/bjc2020.s03

Peripheral artery disease: current diagnosis and management

Jeffrey A Marbach, Aws S Almufleh, Derek So, Aun-Yeong Chong

Abstract

Introduction Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to all arterial disease outside of the coronary arteries and the aorta.1 It is estimated that over 200 million individuals are living with PAD globally.2,3 In the Western world, one in five adults over the age of 75 has PAD, including over 40 million Europeans.3-6 Though the prevalence of PAD is already at endemic levels worldwide, ageing populations and the increasing burden of chronic disease (i.e. hypertension, dyslipidaemia, diabetes mellitus, smoking) will contribute to further increases in the incidence and prevalence of PAD in the coming decades.2,3 As a consequence, PAD is the third

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Combining rivaroxaban with aspirin in stable atherosclerotic vascular disease: clinical evidence from the COMPASS study

March 2020 Br J Cardiol 2020;27(suppl 1):S15–S20 doi:10.5837/bjc2020.s04

Combining rivaroxaban with aspirin in stable atherosclerotic vascular disease: clinical evidence from the COMPASS study

Subramanya G N Upadhyaya, Vinoda Sharma, Derek Connolly

Abstract

Background, epidemiology and rationale for the COMPASS study One quarter of all deaths in the UK in 2017 occurred as a result of diseases of the heart and circulation.1 One in seven men and one in twelve women died from coronary heart disease (CHD).1 The presence of CHD doubles the risk of stroke,2 and more than 100,000 strokes occur in the UK each year.1 Although the mortality rate from circulatory diseases is declining due to advances in treatment,1,3 more than 100,000 deaths resulted from CHD or stroke combined in the UK each year.1 CHD and stroke are the two leading causes of death worldwide.4 Circulatory disease is also associated with a

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