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Tag Archives: quality of life

Management of refractory angina: the importance of winning over both hearts and minds

June 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:45–6 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.018

Management of refractory angina: the importance of winning over both hearts and minds

Christine Wright, Ranil de Silva

Abstract

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June 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:45–6 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.14

Reducing the cost of heart failure while improving quality of life

Richard Brown, Andrew L Clark

Abstract

In the USA, in 2008 the total inflation-adjusted cost of heart failure admissions was US$10.7 billion, compared with US$6.9 billion in 1997.2 So heart failure admissions are expensive and there is considerable interest in how we might reduce admissions, thereby reducing costs and leading to an improved quality of life (QoL) for patients with heart failure.3  One solution might be the Observation Unit (OU) proposed by Collins et al.4 as an alternative to hospital admission for patients needing a brief period (under 24 hours) of intravenous diuretic therapy. Observation, by definition, is the use of appropriate monitoring, diagnostic testing,

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Assessing the health-related quality of life in patients hospitalised for acute heart failure

April 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:72–6 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.013 Online First

Assessing the health-related quality of life in patients hospitalised for acute heart failure

Paul Swinburn, Sarah Shingler, Siew Hwa Ong, Pascal Lecomte, Andrew Lloyd

Abstract

Introduction Acute heart failure (AHF) has been defined by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) as the rapid onset of, or change in, symptoms and signs of heart failure, and is a life-threatening condition that requires immediate medical attention.1 These symptoms and signs include shortness of breath at rest or during exertion, fatigue, pulmonary or peripheral fluid retention, a cough, and evidence of an abnormality of the structure or function of the heart at rest.2-4 This change in cardiac function results in an urgent need for therapy, and AHF is among the most common causes of hospitalisation.5 AHF can, therefore, be seen to represen

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August 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18(Suppl 2):s1-s15

Anaemia in chronic heart failure – how common is it and what does it mean?

Iain Squire

Abstract

Prevalence In published reports of patients with heart failure, the prevalence of anaemia varies markedly, reflecting the very varied characteristics of the studied populations. In reports based upon clinical trials, the reported prevalence ranges from 10–25% (figure 1), while in cohorts of patients in observational or registry-based studies, it appears to be higher, from 15–50% (figure 2). This variation is unsurprising given the relatively selected nature of patients recruited to clinical trials in CHF. A reasonable overall estimate can be gleaned from a large systematic review of 34 studies, including more than 150,000 patients, in wh

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Public perception of atrial fibrillation and treatment-related adverse events in the UK

April 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:88−93

Public perception of atrial fibrillation and treatment-related adverse events in the UK

Scott Doyle, Andrew Lloyd, Mark Davis

Abstract

Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia affecting approximately six million patients in Europe and 2.3 million in the USA.1 Estimates in the general population suggest a prevalence rate of 0.4–1.0%, with marked increase in prevalence with age, increasing to approximately 10% by the age of 80 years.2 AF can precipitate heart failure, ventricular arrhythmias, and it is associated with a four- to five-fold increase in chance of stroke.3,4 In addition, although AF is frequently asymptomatic, it can reduce quality of life causing fatigue, palpitations, anxiety and dizziness.3 AF is classified in three ways:5 Paroxy

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Impact of the ageing population on cardiac surgery in the UK

February 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:5-6

Impact of the ageing population on cardiac surgery in the UK

Marjan Jahangiri

Abstract

Choice of surgery The mainstay of cardiac surgery is CABG, which is performed for both symptomatic and prognostic reasons. In elderly asymptomatic patients, the prognostic value of the operation has to be thought through carefully and in the context of the patient’s general health and lifestyle. The overall risk following CABG in patients older than 80 years is approximately 8%.2 Recently, there has been an increase in the number of elderly patients referred for cardiac surgery. One of the reasons is the emergence of minimally invasive techniques like transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and off-pump CABG (beating heart). It was

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July 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:183-84

Angina – more of a chronic problem than clinicians think

Usha Prasad, David Gray

Abstract

Lessons Both patients and doctors can learn from this study. Patients need to be better informed about the natural history of coronary heart disease and what can be done to try to alter it – that is control not cure. Patients also need to understand the limitations of pharmaceutical agents and what revascularisation strategies can realistically achieve in the short and long term. In particular, over-optimistic pre-operative expectations1 need to be tempered with a dose of reality – the TV soaps and tabloid newspapers and magazines may be partly responsible – but more detailed explanation prior to intervention would not go amiss. Doctors

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