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Tag Archives: salt

October 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:217

Correspondence

Drs Ewan J McKay, Tina Tian, Nick Gerning, Chris Sawh, Pankaj Garg, John Purvis, Sinead Hughes and Mark Noble

Abstract

When the dentist said: “Be still your beating heart!” Dear Sirs, We all often encounter a patient history and apparent presenting complaint that we can not precisely and cleverly explain. Our patient, Mr BW, a fit and active 53-year-old man, attended a routine appointment as an outpatient. He had done this many times previously as he was experiencing difficuties with heart rate control and troubling symptoms secondary to atrial fibrillation (AF). Coincidentally, he had also had amalgam dental fillings drilled some 18 months previously. Since then, his cardiac problems had escalated. There appeared no clear causality between the fillings a

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June 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:111–12

In brief

Abstract

Controversial salt paper published A new European study has caused controversy by suggesting that lowering salt intake may not be beneficial. The study, published recently in JAMA (May 4th 2011 issue), was conducted by a team from the University of Leuven, Belgium. They followed 3,681 participants who were free of cardiovascular disease at baseline for a median of 7.9 years, and found an inverse relationship between cardiovascular deaths and 24-hour sodium excretion (which correlates to salt intake), although systolic blood pressure was higher with higher salt intake. But an editorial in the Lancet (May 12th 2011 issue) criticises the study,

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Report from the 20th Scientific Meeting of the European Society of Hypertension, Oslo, Norway

July 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:168-170

Report from the 20th Scientific Meeting of the European Society of Hypertension, Oslo, Norway

Abstract

An initial proof of principle study was reported in The Lancet (Krum H et al. Lancet 2009;373:1275–81) by Dr Henry Krum (Monash University, Melbourne, Australia) and co-investigators who, using the newly developed Symplicity® catheter system, performed RDN in 45 patients with resistant hypertension (systolic blood pressure [SBP] ≥160 mmHg on three antihypertensive agents); the procedure lasting a median of 38 minutes. The primary end points were office blood pressure (BP) and safety data at one, three, six, nine and 12 months, and patient’s renal angiography and magnetic resonance angiography during follow-up. BP was significantly redu

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