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Tag Archives: screening

April 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:48–9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.014 Online First

Should we be targeting people with diabetes when screening for atrial fibrillation?

Angela Hall, Andrew Mitchell

Abstract

Relationship between diabetes and AF Mass screening of AF in the STROKESTOP study2 discovered diabetes, heart failure and previous stroke/transient ischaemic attack (TIA) to be the strongest predictors for AF in multi-variate analysis. This confirms findings from the historical Framingham study, where diabetes conferred a 1.4-fold increased risk of stroke in men and a 1.6-fold increased risk in women.3 A recent review of the evidence from AF screening studies in those with perceived high risks, has demonstrated the prevalence of AF in people with diabetes ranges from 2.9%4 to 18.5%.2 Chan and Choy’s study (2016)5 did not find diabetes to be

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February 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:(1) doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.002 Online First

‘Quick-scan’ cardiac ultrasound in a high-risk general practice population

Nora C Fabich, Harpal Harrar, John B Chambers

Abstract

Introduction Heart failure and valve disease are common. The population prevalence of each is 2–3% and this rises to more than 10% aged ≥75 years.1,2 Echocardiography is a key diagnostic investigation but it is a relatively scarce resource and is also underutilised.3 It has been suggested that access can be improved by targeting high-risk individuals using limited ‘point-of-care’ studies also called ‘quick-scans’.4 There has been an increase in the application of ‘quick-scans’ with the development of hand-held machines, which allow near-patient testing in the community or on ward-rounds, in clinics or in emergency departments.

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The effectiveness of a mobile ECG device in identifying AF: sensitivity, specificity and predictive value

April 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:70–2 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.013 Online First

The effectiveness of a mobile ECG device in identifying AF: sensitivity, specificity and predictive value

Jonathan Williams, Keith Pearce, Ivan Benett

Abstract

Introduction People with atrial fibrillation (AF) are five times more likely to have a stroke.1 AF is an increasing problem as our population gets older.2 It is, therefore, important to be able to identify this condition as early as possible, when intervention with anticoagulation can prevent stroke, as is recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), in most cases.3 Several studies have attempted to identify the most effective way of screening for, or case-finding, AF.4-7 The gold standard for diagnosis of AF is a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG). However, the 12-lead ECG is an impractical diagnostic tool for a

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The efficacy of a smartphone ECG application for cardiac screening in an unselected island population

March 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:31–3 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.009

The efficacy of a smartphone ECG application for cardiac screening in an unselected island population

Pierre Le Page, Hamish MacLachlan, Lisa Anderson, Lee-Ann Penn, Angela Moss, Andrew R J Mitchell; from the Jersey International Centre for Advanced Studies

Abstract

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Using limb-lead ECGs to investigate asymptomatic atrial fibrillation in primary care

June 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:64–8 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.015

Using limb-lead ECGs to investigate asymptomatic atrial fibrillation in primary care

Wasim Javed, Matthew Fay, Mark Hashemi, Steven Lindsay, Melanie Thorpe, David Fitzmaurice 

Abstract

Introduction Screening has been proposed as a method to detect patients with undiagnosed atrial fibrillation (AF) as it is a dangerous, prevalent condition that may be easily diagnosed with a simple low-cost test, an electrocardiogram (ECG), and the risk of serious sequelae such as ischaemic stroke can be effectively reduced with anticoagulation.1 Hence, it fulfils the Wilson Jungner criteria for a screening programme.2 The potential benefits of AF screening are far reaching, as reducing stroke prevalence has massive implications for both patients and health services in the UK, where stroke consumes approximately 5% of total National Health S

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Incidence screening for primary prevention ICDs based on UK guidelines following STEMI

November 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:170–2 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.030

Incidence screening for primary prevention ICDs based on UK guidelines following STEMI

Ellen Berry, Helen Padgett, Melanie Doyle, Arif J Ahsan, Andrew D Staniforth

Abstract

Introduction The implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implant rate within the UK remains significantly lower than that across Europe; furthermore, there is marked inequity in access to ICD implant between regions within the UK.1 The need for an ICD is self-evident in secondary prevention patients successfully resuscitated from ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF). Intuitively, therefore, it would seem most likely that underperformance and inequity of access in the UK resides chiefly within the primary prevention patient group. A number of international randomised-controlled trials have identified patient subgr

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September 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16: 231-235

Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in patients with established ischaemic heart disease

Rachel Abela, Ioannis Prionidis, Timothy Beresford, Gerald Clesham, Delphine Turner, Reto Gamma, Tom Browne

Abstract

Introduction The UK government’s recent commitment to aneurysm screening and the potential for funding this, will undoubtedly lead to increased interest in the organisation of new screening programmes by different trusts. In April 2007, the UK National Screening committee – AAA Screening Working Group published a draft for Standard Operating Procedures For An Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Screening Programme.1 The recommendations for population selection offer a single scan for males in the year they reach 65 years of age and also for males over 65 on request. Females, males under 65, those receiving previous AAA surgery, patients with

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January 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:7–11

New cardiovascular screening programmes planned

BJCardio editorial team

Abstract

Speaking to health professionals at King’s College, London, the PM said that, over time, everyone in England will have access to the right preventative health check-up. He said the first priority was to offer men over 65 a simple ultrasound test to detect early abdominal aortic aneurysm, which should save more than 1,600 lives each year. The government is also planning to introduce on the NHS a series of tests to identify vulnerability to heart and circulation problems.  “So there will soon be check-ups on offer to monitor for heart disease, strokes, diabetes and kidney disease – conditions which affect the lives of 6.2 million people,

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November 2005 Br J Cardiol 2005;12:471-6

Hypertension – its detection, prevalence, control and treatment in a quality driven British general practice

Peter Standing, Helen Deakin, Paul Norman, Ruth Standing

Abstract

No content available

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July 2003 Br J Cardiol 2003;10:315-7

Screening for asymptomatic peripheral vascular disease in primary care

Kamlesh Khunti

Abstract

No content available

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