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Tag Archives: ST-elevation myocardial infarction

January 2018 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.004 Online First

Recognition and management of aVR STEMI: a retrospective cohort study

Ruan Vlok, Joshua Wall, Hannah Kempton, Thomas Melhuish, Astin Lee, Leigh White

Abstract

Figure 1. ST-elevation in aVR Introduction The variety of electrocardiogram (ECG) changes that occur following acute myocardial infarction (AMI), occur in concordance with coronary circulation anatomy. ST-segment elevation in lead aVR can indicate an anterior wall AMI.1,2 However, lead aVR is commonly neglected by clinicians,3 and as such, this may be a potential source of adverse patient outcomes. The aim of this single-centre study is to investigate how proficiently AMIs presenting with aVR ST-elevation are recognised, using ‘door-to-balloon times’ as an outcome measure in patients having primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)

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April 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:72-4 doi:10.5837/bjc.2017.011 Online First

Recognition and management of posterior myocardial infarction: a retrospective cohort study

Leigh D White, Joshua Wall, Thomas M Melhuish, Ruan Vlok, Astin Lee

Abstract

Introduction An acute myocardial infarction causes a number of electrocardiogram (ECG) changes corresponding to coronary anatomy.1,2 The posterior myocardial infarction (PMI) refers to an infarction of the posterior wall of the left ventricle (LV).3 On the 12-lead ECG, the key to detecting a PMI is through indirect evidence via ST-depression in the antero-septal (V1–V4) leads and evolving R-waves in V1 or V2 with R/S ratios >1.1 A common theory is that these evolving R-waves represent inverted Q-waves. While ST-depression typically occurs in V1–V4, it may also extend into V5 and perhaps other leads.4 In these cases, posterior occlusion

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Pre-alert calls for primary PCI: a single-centre experience

October 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:157 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.035 Online First

Pre-alert calls for primary PCI: a single-centre experience

Jennifer A Rossington, Stephen F Cole, Yasmin Zaidy, Michael S Cunnington, Richard M Oliver

Abstract

Introduction Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) is the preferred management for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI),1 and guidance committees have universally adopted this strategy as the ‘gold standard’ of care.2-4 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines mandate that PPCI is not only accessible to the entire population of the UK, but also that this is delivered in a timely fashion.4 Therefore, the early identification of appropriate STEMI patients for PPCI is essential, but this can be complicated due to the volume of patients, inadequate training and experience of frontline emergency car

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June 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:65 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.17 Online First

Prognostic value of renal function in STEMI patients treated with primary PCI: ANIN Registry 

Magdalena Polanska-Skrzypczyk, Maciej Karcz, Pawel Bekta, Cezary Kepka, Jakub Przyluski, Mariusz Kruk, Ewa Ksiezycka, Andrzej Ciszewski, Witold Ruzyllo, Adam Witkowski

Abstract

Introduction Myocardial infarction with persistent ST-elevation (STEMI) continues to be a major public health problem. In a recent report, the incidence of hospital admissions for STEMI in Europe varied between 44 and 142 per 100,000 inhabitants per year, and in-hospital mortality reached 13.5%.1 More than 30% of STEMI patients have chronic kidney disease (CKD).2 On the other hand, half of deaths in advanced CKD patients are of cardiovascular causes with myocardial infarction (MI) being the most frequent event.3 Patients with CKD are routinely excluded from cardiovascular clinical trials, and certain medications and treatment modalities are l

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July 2006 Br J Cardiol 2006;13:284-86

Should acute MI patients receive dual antiplatelet therapy: a review of new data

Anthony Gershlick

Abstract

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