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Tag Archives: structural heart disease

Pacing in patients with congenital heart disease: part 3

March 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:38 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.006

Pacing in patients with congenital heart disease: part 3

Khaled Albouaini, Archana Rao, David Ramsdale

Abstract

Introduction In the first article, we discussed those anomalies that are usually encountered by chance at, or just prior to, implantation; patent foramen ovale/atrial septal defect, Ebstein’s anomaly and ventricular septal defect, and the potential problems that they may provide to the device implanter. In the second article, we discussed the challenge of device implantation in patients with more complex congenital structural cardiac defects, which the operator should be aware of prior to device implantation, including congenitally corrected L-transposition of great arteries, tetralogy of Fallot and tricuspid atresia/univentricular heart. I

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Pacing in patients with congenital heart disease: part 2

November 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:151–3 doi:10.5837/bjc/2013.31

Pacing in patients with congenital heart disease: part 2

Khaled Albouaini, Archana Rao, David Ramsdale

Abstract

Introduction In the previous article, we discussed those anomalies that are usually encountered by chance at, or just prior to, implantation: patent foramen ovale/atrial septal defect, Ebstein’s anomaly and ventricular septal defect, and the potential problems that they may provide to the device implanter. In this and the next article, we will discuss the challenge of device implantation in patients with more complex congenital structural cardiac defects, which the operator should be aware of prior to device implantation. In this paper we include congenitally corrected L-transposition of great arteries (L-TGA), tetralogy of Fallot and tricu

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Pacing in patients with congenital heart disease: part 1

September 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:117–20 doi:10.5837/bjc/2013.028

Pacing in patients with congenital heart disease: part 1

Khaled Albouaini, Archana Rao, David Ramsdale

Abstract

Introduction The vast majority of patients requiring pacemaker or defibrillator implantation have structurally normal hearts and patients with congenital cardiac abnormalities constitute only a small proportion. The latter can be divided into two groups. The first includes those with undiscovered congenital abnormalities, which do not give rise to symptoms or obvious physical signs, such as dextrocardia, persistent left-sided superior vena cava, atrial septal defect and patent foramen ovale. The second group includes those who are known to have structural cardiac abnormalities, such as Ebstein’s anomaly, ventricular septal defect, transposi

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