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Tag Archives: syncope

January 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:19–22 doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.003 Online First

ICMs can be routinely implanted in a non-theatre environment by a cardiac physiologist

Varun Sharnam, Stelios Iacovides, Luisa Cleverdon, Wasing Taggu, Philip Keeling

Abstract

Introduction Implantable cardiac monitors (ICMs) are becoming more commonly recommended during the investigation of a patient with transient loss of consciousness.1,2 The original first-generation devices were implanted by a surgical procedure, usually by a cardiologist in a cardiac catheterisation theatre on a day-case basis, lasting up to 30–45 minutes per procedure. This process is inherently resource heavy for theatre time, staff (implanting physician, catheter lab nurses, cardiac radiographer and cardiac physiologist), in addition to pre-admission assessment, surgical equipment and patient recovery in a day-case facility. The developme

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April 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:54–7 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.012 Online First

A study in the diagnosis and management of syncope: a retrospective review

Joseph Wilson, Donna Dalgetty, Selda Ahmet, Nida Taher, Mehran Asgari

Abstract

Introduction The aim of this study was to introduce a syncope pathway to the Ipswich Hospital NHS Trust (IHT), a busy district general hospital (DGH) and to emphasise the need for a syncope unit. We analysed the care of 500 patients treated for a syncopal event, our hypothesis being that the management of syncope within the trust was not up to the standards laid out in current guidelines. We also hypothesised that small changes, as well as larger scale organisational ones, would be hugely beneficial to patient care. If management was in line with guidelines, then we endeavoured to introduce a ‘Syncope Unit’ based on the European Heart Rhy

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April 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:58–62 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.013 Online First

A novel ambulatory syncope assessment unit is safe and cost-effective in a low-risk patient cohort

Hamish I MacLachlan, Christopher J Allen, Gothandaraman Balaji

Abstract

Introduction Up to half of the UK population will experience syncope in their lifetime,1 although only a minority will seek medical attention.2 Studies report a constant frequency of syncope in European emergency departments (EDs) with an incidence of 1% of all attendances.3 With a lifetime risk of syncope estimated at 42%,4 it accounts for significant morbidity.5,6 Uncovering the precise aetiology behind a syncopal episode remains a diagnostic challenge for clinicians, and only half of those admitted to hospital will be given a diagnosis on discharge.7 Effective management of syncope relies on early clinical evaluation by specialist staff th

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June 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:62-5 doi:http://doi.org/10.5837/bjc.2017.013

Transient loss of consciousness (TLoC) in primary care: a review of patients presenting with first blackout

Lesley Kavi

Abstract

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Heart Rhythm Congress 2015

December 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:146

Heart Rhythm Congress 2015

Afzal Sohaib, Kevin Leong

Abstract

Plenary session – precision medicine for the next decade A distinguished line-up of speakers enlightened the congress on the future of rhythm management in this session. Dr Calum MacCrae (Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, USA) opened our eyes to the ongoing challenges and potential of genetic testing to tailor the treatment of cardiovascular disease. From genetics and genomics we moved on to proteomics, where Professor Manual Mayr (King’s College London) enlightened us on how this emerging and rapidly growing discipline can shape the future of rhythm management. Professor A John Camm (President, Arrhythmia Alliance) brought the conc

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Recurrent syncope in head and neck cancer: a case report with literature review

December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:157–9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.36

Recurrent syncope in head and neck cancer: a case report with literature review

James Maurice, Hariharan Kuhan, Han B Xiao

Abstract

Introduction Syncope is defined as a transient loss of consciousness due to cerebral hypoperfusion followed by rapid and complete recovery. It is a common complaint, accounting for 3–5% of Accident and Emergency (A&E) attendances, and up to 50% of these patients are admitted to hospital.1 One rare cause of reflex syncope is mechanical stimulation of the carotid sinus by cancers of the head and neck, and this case demonstrates the challenges in its management. Case report A 68-year-old male presented to the A&E department having suffered from nine episodes of collapse on the day of admission. With the aid of collateral history from h

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Lessons learnt from a tragic loss – but will things improve?

August 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:141–3 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.027

Lessons learnt from a tragic loss – but will things improve?

Stephen Westaby, Ravi De Silva, Shane George, Duncan Young, Yaver Bashir

Abstract

Case report Figure 1. The extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) system A 20-year-old female student under investigation for syncopal attacks was found to have a normal electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac morphology on echocardiography. She then suffered ventricular fibrillation at rest while talking to friends. They performed cardiac massage and a paramedic ambulance arrived within four minutes. Defibrillation was attempted using anterior and lateral electrodes. When this was unsuccessful, she was intubated and a Lucas cardiac compression device applied, even though the Accident and Emergency (A&E) department was less than one mile a

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September 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:245–8

Ictal bradycardia and asystole associated with intractable epilepsy: a case series

Elijah Chaila, Jaspreet Bhangu, Sandya Tirupathi, Norman Delanty

Abstract

Introduction Heart rhythm changes are common during seizures, even those seizures not associated with convulsive activity. Most studies report tachycardia, a heart rate increase of more than 10 beats per minute above the baseline, as the most common rhythm abnormality occurring in 64–100% of temporal lobe seizures.1,2 By contrast, ictal bradycardia has been reported in less than 6% of patients with complex partial seizures.3,4 The ictal bradycardia syndrome occurs in those with established epilepsy when epileptic discharges disrupt normal cardiac rhythm leading to a decrease in heart rate of more than 10 beats per minute below the baseline.

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10 steps before you refer for syncope

February 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:28-31

10 steps before you refer for syncope

Matthew Fay, Richard Sutton

Abstract

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January 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16:9–10

Rapid access blackout clinics: a priority for the elderly

Declan Byrne, Diarmuid O’Shea

Abstract

Prognostic implications There are profound prognostic implications for those suffering from syncope – Soteriades et al., in their study, evaluated the incidence and prognosis of syncope in participants in the Framingham Heart Study.5 They found the most frequently identified causes were vasovagal syncope, cardiac syncope and orthostatic hypotension: 36% still had no demonstrable cause. There was no increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity or mortality associated with vasovagal syncope, but persons in this study who fell into the diagnostic categories of cardiac syncope or syncope of unknown cause, were at increased risk of death from any

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