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Tag Archives: valvular heart disease

October 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26(4) doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.033 Online First

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients with systolic heart failure

Tariq Enezate, Jad Omran, Obai Abdullah, Ehtisham Mahmud

Abstract

Introduction Systolic heart failure (SHF) in patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) carries a worse prognosis, and aortic valve replacement improves ventricular systolic function and survival.1,2 Therefore, SHF is an indication for aortic valve replacement in severe AS.2 Both surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) are associated with comparable survival and ventricular systolic function recovery in this group of patients.3 TAVR, however, is the recommended approach for patients with intermediate to prohibitive surgical risk; and SHF patients are often considered a high-risk group. As a re

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October 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:135–7 Online First

News from ESC 2018: Is it safe for women with heart disease to become pregnant?

BJC Staff

Abstract

European Society of Cardiology congress 2018, held in Munich Professor Jolien Roos-Hesselink, said: “Pregnancy is safe for most women with heart disease but for some it is too risky. Our study shows that fewer women with heart disease die or have heart failure during pregnancy than 10 years ago. However, nearly one in 10 women with pulmonary arterial hypertension died during pregnancy or early post-partum.” She added that pre-pregnancy counselling is crucial to identify women who should be advised against pregnancy, for instance in those with severe valvular heart disease, and to discuss the risks, options and to initiate timely treatment

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February 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:27–30 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.003 Online First

Incidence of cardiac surgery following PCI: insights from a high-volume, non-surgical, UK centre

Andrew Whittaker, Peregrine Green, Giles Coverdale, Omar Rana, Terry Levy

Abstract

Introduction It is accepted that coronary revascularisation with coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) provides both symptomatic and prognostic benefit in patients with multi-vessel coronary artery disease (mvCAD).1,2 Both percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and CABG provide better relief of angina symptoms than medical therapy alone.1,3 Large, randomised-controlled trials (RCTs), in recent years, have demonstrated that CABG offers an improved outcome in patients with complex three-vessel coronary artery disease (CAD), especially in those with co-existing diabetes mellitus.4,5 However, in patients with one- or two-vessel CAD, PCI o

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