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Tag Archives: angina

February 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:11 Online First

Correspondence: accurate classification of chest pain

Drs Yasmin Ismail, Nathan Manghat, and Mark Hamilton

Abstract

Dear Sirs, Statistical probabilistic reasoning is important in understanding the likelihood of ‘false-positive’ (FP) and ‘false negative’ (FN) results when requesting any diagnostic test. In cohorts with a low prevalence of disease, a significant number of positive results are likely to be FP. Conversely, when the disease has high prevalence, FN results increase. Identification of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) relies on clinical history, examination and electrocardiogram (ECG)/laboratory results. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) define angina as “typical” or “atypical” depend

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Acute coronary syndromes among South Asian subgroups in the UK: symptoms and epidemiology

October 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:153–7 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.033 Online First

Acute coronary syndromes among South Asian subgroups in the UK: symptoms and epidemiology

Simon W Dubrey, Sarah Ghonim, Molly Teoh

Abstract

Introduction Approximately 4.2 million people (7.5% of population), whose racial origins are from South Asia, live in the UK. High rates of coronary disease in Asians,1-4 seem likely to be influenced by genetic factors.5 We have previously reported differences in the presentation of coronary syndromes between British South Asians, as a whole, and white Europeans.6 The term ‘South Asian’ describes around 1.5 billion people (22.5% of the world’s population), occupying regions as diverse as Sri Lanka to Nepal. A wide variety of genotypes, cultures, diets, belief systems, educational attainment, socioeconomic status and risk factors are enc

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March 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:13

BJC Learning angina programme

Abstract

Coronary heart disease is responsible for one sixth of UK deaths. Improvements in making an earlier diagnosis and more effective management have aided a reduction in mortality over the last two decades. Such improvements would not have been possible without well thought-out and carefully constructed guidance and teaching programmes. With the spread of internet technology, online medical education has seen an exponential growth in popularity. The British Journal of Cardiology (BJC) has recently launched its e-learning site BJC Learning and its first e-learning programme on angina (www.bjcardio.co.uk/learning). The angina e-learning programme

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What do angina patients understand of options for myocardial revascularisation?

May 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:65–9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.013

What do angina patients understand of options for myocardial revascularisation?

Vedat Barut, Kevin Fox, Alison Mead

Abstract

Introduction Angina is the most common presentation of coronary heart disease (CHD).1 Effective treatment requires appropriate medical care, but also patient participation in lifestyle changes and medication concordance. Patient understanding of their disease and its treatment is desirable to enhance patient participation. Angina may be treated with medication only, through percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). Although there are some circumstances where there is a preferred treatment option, research increasingly shows that in many situations the different treatment options for angina have similar

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Drugs for diabetes: part 9 prescribing for patients with cardiac disease

May 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:85–9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.017

Drugs for diabetes: part 9 prescribing for patients with cardiac disease

Anna White, Gerard A McKay, Miles Fisher

Abstract

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October 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18(Suppl 3):s1-s12 doi:10.5837/bjc.2011.s01

Introduction

Abstract

The Euro Heart Survey documented considerable variation in the management of patients with new-onset stable angina, due in part to uncertainties about the prognostic impact of both drug treatment and revascularisation. These uncertainties were inevitable given that much of the evidence used to guide management was incomplete and out of date. There have been further developments since the European Society of Cardiology guidelines on angina were published in 2006: these include better understanding of the efficacy and role of newer agents such as ivabradine and ranolazine, better understanding of secondary prevention measures, and refinements i

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The management of stable angina

October 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18(Suppl 3):s1-s12 doi:10.5837/bjc.2011.s02

The management of stable angina

Dr Chris Arden

Abstract

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The medical management of stable angina

October 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18(Suppl 3):s1-s12 doi:10.5837/bjc.2011.s03

The medical management of stable angina

Professor Kim Fox

Abstract

The new guideline from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE)1 covers adults who have been diagnosed with stable angina due to atherosclerotic disease, following on from clinical guideline 95,2 which advises on diagnosis of chest pain of recent onset. A key priority for implementation in the latest guidance is to ensure that people with stable angina receive balanced information and have the opportunity to discuss the benefits, limitations and risks of their treatment. Initial management of stable angina should be to offer optimal drug treatment, addressing both the angina itself and secondary prevention of cardiovas

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October 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18(Suppl 3):s1-s12 doi:10.5837/bjc.2011.s04

Community-based angina clinics and the therapeutic management of patients with coronary artery disease

Drs Thornton-Chan and colleagues

Abstract

The objective of this study was to look at how well patients with coronary artery disease are managed, and whether community-based angina clinics might be an alternative, or even more beneficial, to these patients compared with hospital-based clinics. Patients with coronary artery disease need regular follow-ups to review their lifestyle and medications, and to ensure angina symptoms are well controlled. Heart rates should be checked regularly as high heart rate is associated with increased risk of myocardial ischaemia. In this study, 41 patients with coronary artery disease were assessed at a community-based angina clinic. Our results showe

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Implementation of the new NICE guidelines for stable chest pain: likely impact on chest pain services in the UK

August 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:185–88

Implementation of the new NICE guidelines for stable chest pain: likely impact on chest pain services in the UK

Dominic Kelly, Stephen Cole, Fiona Rossiter, Karen Mallinson, Anita Smith, Iain Simpson

Abstract

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