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Tag Archives: aortic stenosis

September 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:99–100 doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.028

My 60-year relationship with aortic stenosis

Anthony P C Bacon, Harry Rosen, Neil Ruparelia

Abstract

Dr Anthony P C Bacon Introduction It may be invidious to write about oneself and one’s own disorders, but perhaps exception can be made when there is a gap of 60 years between writing about a condition and reporting one’s own case of it at the age of 94. In my case (APCB), the prospect of a general anaesthetic accompanied recurrent cholecystitis and dyspnoea, so I dusted off my stethoscope and on listening to my heart, I was somewhat taken aback to find that I had developed aortic stenosis. Early career Having qualified in 1947, and following 18 months in the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) in Germany in 1948–9, I began work again in th

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May 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:50

Quick takes from ACC.19: The American College of Cardiology 68th Annual Scientific Sessions

Gerald Chi, Syed Hassan Abbas Kazmi, C. Michael Gibson

Abstract

ACC.19 was held in New Orleans, US PARTNER 3 and Evolut Low Risk add to evidence base for TAVR Prior literature suggests that transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR) is non-inferior or even superior to standard surgical aortic-valve replacement (SAVR) among high and intermediate surgical risk patients with aortic stenosis (AS). Two pivotal studies have now addressed the efficacy and safety of TAVR in AS patients at low mortality risk from surgery. PARTNER 3 (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02675114) was an open-label trial that randomised 1,000 subjects with severe AS at low mortality risk from surgery into either TAVR with a third-generation ba

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April 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:97–8 doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.015 Online First

Avoiding needless deaths in aortic stenosis

John B Chambers

Abstract

Professor John B Chambers Introduction Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common type of primary heart valve disease in industrialised countries. Although echocardiography is key for its assessment, the need for surgery is most frequently dictated by symptoms.1 However, the history can be surprisingly elusive, and physicians without specialist competencies in valve disease may miss their onset.2 This is important because the risk of death is approximately 1% per annum without symptoms but 4% in the first three months after the onset of symptoms,3 usually before the patient has time to contact their physician (figure 1). It then rises up to 14%

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Patients with a mechanical mitral valve are potential candidates for TAVI

April 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:(2) doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.015 Online First

Patients with a mechanical mitral valve are potential candidates for TAVI

Katie E O’Sullivan, Eoghan T Hurley, Declan Sugrue, John P Hurley

Abstract

Introduction Figure 1. View at time of implantation demonstrating a newly deployed JenaValveTM in a patient with a Medtronic-Hall disc valve in the mitral position Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become standard of care for patients with severe aortic stenosis at prohibitive operative risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR).1 The first randomised-controlled trial of TAVI stipulated the presence of a mitral valve prosthesis as an exclusion criterion for enrolment in the trial.2 The main reason was concern that dysfunction of the mitral valve prosthesis might arise during TAVI valve deployment.3 Further concerns wer

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September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:96–7 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.026

TAVI – assessing the need for circulatory support

Christopher J Allen, Alison M Duncan, Neil E Moat, Alistair C Lindsay

Abstract

Detailed preoperative work-up and careful patient selection with input from multi-disciplinary ‘heart teams’ (cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists, anaesthetists, nursing staff) are integral to good practice and to minimising the risk of what remains a complex and often challenging procedure. Serious complications (e.g. severe aortic regurgitation, major bleeding, device embolisation, coronary occlusion, and aortic dissection) are uncommon (<5%), but may precipitate sudden haemodynamic collapse necessitating cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) or other mechanical support. Current guidelines, therefore, mandate ‘full haemodynamic c

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February 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:34-6

Aortic valvuloplasty – is a revival merited?

Richard J Jabbour, Dion Stub, Antony S Walton

Abstract

Introduction Balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) was first developed by Alain Cribier over 30 years ago for the management of aortic stenosis (AS).1 It was initially met with great enthusiasm due to its minimally invasive nature and possible alternative to surgery, but later fell from grace due mainly to high restenosis and complication rates. In addition, suboptimal results were obtained when compared with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR).2 However, the evolution of techniques and devices culminating in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has drastically shifted the treatment options for high-risk patients with severe AS. T

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Establishing an aortic stenosis surveillance clinic

November 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:286–9

Establishing an aortic stenosis surveillance clinic

David Turpie, Matthew Maycock, Chiala Crawford, Kathleen Aitken, Marwen Macdonald, Colin Farman, Maimie L P Thompson, Jamie Smith, Stephen J Cross, Stephen J Leslie

Abstract

Criteria for an AS surveillance clinic were developed. Patients who were deemed suitable were identified from existing echocardiographic databases, discharge coding and review of the clinical notes. Patients with AS were identified (n=612). After a review of echocardiographic parameters, 117 patients were considered suitable for technician-led review. Of these, 47 patients (40%) were subsequently discharged from the cardiology clinic. A small proportion of patients are reviewed in the general cardiology clinic for no other reason than asymptomatic mild AS (5% of follow-up appointments). Establishment of a national AS surveillance programme c

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November 2003 Br J Cardiol 2003;10:453-61

The surgical management of aortic valve disease

Joanna Chikwe, Axel Walther, John Pepper

Abstract

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May 2003 Br J Cardiol 2003;10:217

Left ventricular hypertrophy and aortic stenosis: a commentary

Kim Rajappan, Jamil Mayet

Abstract

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May 2003 Br J Cardiol 2003;10:214-16

Left ventricular hypertrophy and aortic stenosis: a possible role for ACE inhibition?

Helen C Routledge, Kairen R Ong, Jonathon N Townend

Abstract

No content available

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