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Tag Archives: atherosclerosis

December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 3):S1–S19 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s05

Dyslipidaemia and atherosclerotic vascular disease: DYSIS results in the UK

Vian Amber, Kornelia Kotseva, Elizabeth L Turner, Catriona Jennings, Alison Atrey, Jennifer Jones, Susan Connolly, Timothy J Bowker, David A Wood, on behalf of the DYSIS Study Group UK 

Abstract

Background Statins are first choice for treatment of dyslipidaemia in both secondary and primary cardiovascular disease prevention. For every 1.0 mmol/L reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL‑C), the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality decreases by 19% and overall mortality decreases by 12%.1 Despite statin treatment, a substantial number of cardiovascular events still occur, and one reason may be persistent lipid abnormalities including total cholesterol and LDL-C not at target, or low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) or elevated triglycerides. Results from the DYSlipidaemia International Stu

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Delivering the MyAction programme in different populations: NHS Westminster, London

December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 3):S1–S19 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s07

Delivering the MyAction programme in different populations: NHS Westminster, London

Susan Connolly, Adrian Brown, Sarah-Jane Clements, Christine Yates, Kornelia Kotseva, on behalf of Westminster MyAction teams

Abstract

MyAction Westminster: background In response to the Department of Health (DoH) policy document Putting Prevention First,1 NHS Westminster launched its Health Checks programme in primary care in 2009. The MyAction Westminster programme was concomitantly commissioned by NHS Westminster so that those individuals identified to be at high cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk through the Health Checks could access, with their families, an effective vascular prevention programme that would help them achieve measurably healthier lives. Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust were successful in becoming the providers of the programme with an annual budget

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Delivering the MyAction programme in different populations: Galway, Republic of Ireland

December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 3):S1–S19 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s08

Delivering the MyAction programme in different populations: Galway, Republic of Ireland

Irene Gibson, James Crowley, Jennifer Jones, Claire Kerins, Anne Marie Walsh, Caroline Costello, Jane Windle, Gerard Flaherty, on behalf of Croí MyAction team

Abstract

Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the single most common cause of death in Ireland, with diseases of the circulatory system accounting for 33.5% of deaths.1 While there has been a significant decline in death rates over the last 30 years, CVD mortality rates in Ireland remain high in comparison with European averages.2 There is compelling evidence that managing risk factors through lifestyle intervention and cardioprotective drug management can reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality by up to 90%.3 In Ireland, high-risk approaches to prevention have traditionally targeted those with established heart disease, yet there are many

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Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors 

August 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:126–33 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.024

Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors 

Paul N Durrington

Abstract

Introduction Statins have proved beyond doubt the relevance of reducing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in atherogenic cardiovascular disease (CVD), with the risk of a new CVD event reducing by one-fifth for each 1 mmol/L decrease in LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) achieved.1 A typical patient experiencing an acute coronary event in the UK will do so with LDL-C of 3.8 mmol/L.2 Thus, introducing a statin to achieve a target of just under 2 mmol/L will decrease the risk of a future event by no more than 40%. Unlike more uncommon patients with much higher LDL-C levels, such as those with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia,3 the pre-treatment LDL-

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March 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19(Suppl 1):s1-s16

Lipids and CVD: improving practice and clinical outcome

Abstract

This supplement is a report from the inaugural meeting of the Cardiometabolic Forum, jointly organised by the British Journal of Cardiology and HEART UK – The Cholesterol Charity. The meeting was held at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, London, on 24th November 2011. Meeting chairs were Dr Dermot Neely (Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne) for HEART UK, and Dr Henry Purcell (Royal Brompton Hospital, London, and Editor) for BJC. We hope this supplement will provide readers with an independent overview on recent developments in our knowledge of cholesterol metabolism and its implications for clinical practice. Speakers Dermot Neely

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Lipids and cardiovascular disease: re-thinking targets

March 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19(Suppl 1):s1-s16 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.s01

Lipids and cardiovascular disease: re-thinking targets

Kausik K Ray

Abstract

Worldwide, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death and a major cause of disability affecting quality of life.1 Elevated cholesterol is one of the key risk factors accounting for a substantial proportion of this disease burden. In developed countries, at least one-third of all cardiovascular disease is attributable to five risk factors: smoking, excessive alcohol intake, elevated blood pressure, elevated cholesterol and obesity.2 In particular, elevated cholesterol accounted for 56% of all cases of coronary heart disease (CHD) and 18% of cases of ischaemic stroke (2002 data).2   Improved management of risk factors and

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September 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:237-39

CVD risk and beyond at H·E·A·R·T UK conference 2008

BJC editorial team

Abstract

Risk calculation Dr Peter Brindle, the Research and Development Director and GP at the Bristol Primary Care Trust, lit the spark by taking the first lecture spot. With the title Advances and Controversies in CVD Risk Estimation he was stepping into the lions’ den. Earlier in the year H·E·A·R·T UK welcomed the continued use of well-established and validated risk calculation tools within the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) lipid modification guideline and had endorsed the guideline group’s decision not to recommend more novel experimental approaches. So the delegates were keen to hear Dr Brindle announce the

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September 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:261-5

Renal and cardiac arterial disease: parallels and pitfalls

Timothy Bonnici, David Goldsmith

Abstract

Introduction Renal artery stenosis (RAS), traditionally the preserve of the nephrologist, is a condition of increasing interest to the cardiologist. Ninety per cent of RAS is caused by atherosclerosis and the risk factors for renal atherosclerosis and coronary atherosclerosis are the same. Furthermore, the presence of RAS alters the prognosis of co-existent cardiac disease, most notably cardiac failure and ischaemic heart disease, both directly1–3 and via its sequelae of renal failure and hypertension. Finally, the treatments for the disease, both medical and interventional, are familiar to the cardiologist, who can employ much of the knowl

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May 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:123–30

News from the 57th annual scientific session of the American College of Cardiology

Terry McCormack

Abstract

ENHANCE controversy dominates meeting The controversial ENHANCE (Ezetimibe and Simvastatin in Hypercholesterolaemia Enhances Atherosclerosis Regression) trial of ezetimibe dominated the ACC meeting, with a special session held to discuss the results, which were simultaneously published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The 720-patient trial showed no benefit of ezetimibe when added to simvastatin 80 mg in slowing the progression of atherosclerosis in the carotid artery (as measured by intima media thickness (IMT) in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), despite the fact that there were significantly greater reductions in lo

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November 2006 Br J Cardiol 2006;13:386-90

News from the Scientific Sessions 2006 of the American Heart Association

BJCardio editorial team

Abstract

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