This website is intended for UK healthcare professionals only Log in | Register

Tag Archives: chronic kidney disease

August 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:89–90

New European Society of Cardiology recommendations published

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Chair of the writing group Professor Christian Sticherling (Universitätsspital Basel, Switzerland) said: “Traditionally we interrupted anticoagulation during device implantation and restarted it afterwards. And we bridged with heparin around the time of the operation. The new recommendation is to continue to give the VKA and perform the operation without any bridging. That shows the lowest rate of perioperative bleeding.” He added: “Also new is the recommendation not to interrupt VKAs during ablation and particularly during pulmonary vein isolation which is the most common type of ablation nowadays.” The paper, produced by the EHRA,

| Full text
Rivaroxaban in non-valvular AF – UK experience in perspective

September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21(suppl 1):S1–S11

Rivaroxaban in non-valvular AF – UK experience in perspective

Diana A Gorog

Abstract

ESC guidelines and differences between NOACs Following the roll-out of the novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) published in 2012 a focused update of its guidelines for the management of atrial fibrillation (AF). Since the NOACs tested in clinical trials all showed at least non-inferiority when compared with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), with a better safety profile, particularly with reduction in intracranial haemorrhage (ICH), the ESC 2012 guideline recommended NOACs as broadly preferable to VKAs in the vast majority of patients with non-valvular AF (NVAF).1 In 2013, the European Heart Rhythm Associati

| Full text
What’s hot in cardiorenal medicine

December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:133-5

What’s hot in cardiorenal medicine

Drs Kathryn Watson and Alice Zheng

Abstract

Advances in imaging and diagnosis Dr Nik Abidin (Consultant Cardiologist, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust) kicked off the theme of ‘Advances in diagnosis’ with a tantalising taster of the future of echocardiography, and a demonstration of what is already possible. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a high incidence of cardiac dysfunction, with 75% of patients with significant CKD demonstrating left ventricular hypertrophy. In such patients, left ventricular dilatation occurs late with advanced disease, and left ventricular mass is an earlier predictor of cardiac mortality. An increase in left atrium size is the downstream

| Full text
Assessing kidney function in oral anticoagulant prescribing: an aid for safer drug and dose choices

June 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:61–4 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.16

Assessing kidney function in oral anticoagulant prescribing: an aid for safer drug and dose choices

Su Wood, Duncan Petty, Matthew Fay, Andrew Lewington

Abstract

(more…)

| Full text

June 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:65 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.17 Online First

Prognostic value of renal function in STEMI patients treated with primary PCI: ANIN Registry 

Magdalena Polanska-Skrzypczyk, Maciej Karcz, Pawel Bekta, Cezary Kepka, Jakub Przyluski, Mariusz Kruk, Ewa Ksiezycka, Andrzej Ciszewski, Witold Ruzyllo, Adam Witkowski

Abstract

Introduction Myocardial infarction with persistent ST-elevation (STEMI) continues to be a major public health problem. In a recent report, the incidence of hospital admissions for STEMI in Europe varied between 44 and 142 per 100,000 inhabitants per year, and in-hospital mortality reached 13.5%.1 More than 30% of STEMI patients have chronic kidney disease (CKD).2 On the other hand, half of deaths in advanced CKD patients are of cardiovascular causes with myocardial infarction (MI) being the most frequent event.3 Patients with CKD are routinely excluded from cardiovascular clinical trials, and certain medications and treatment modalities are l

| Full text

February 2013 Online First

British Society of Heart Failure Young Investigators’ Award

Abstract

Multipolar left ventricular pacing to optimise acute haemodynamic response to cardiac resynchronisation therapy SY Ahsan (presenting author), B Sabberwal, C Hayward, P Lambiase, M Thomas, GG Babu, S Aggarwal, MD Lowe, AWC Chow The Heart Hospital, Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London Purpose: Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) reduces morbidity and mortality in a sub-group of patients with heart failure, though up to 30% of patients have no benefit. CRT patients are heterogeneous and an individualised approach to CRT may be needed to increase response rate. We evaluated the impact

| Full text
News from the 7th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Cardiorenal Forum

December 2012 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:20–1 Online First

News from the 7th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Cardiorenal Forum

Abstract

Introduction As doctors and scientists we are accustomed to breaking down problems and simplifying complex pathology in order to focus our management and identify possible targets for future therapies. The pathophysiology of cardiorenal disease is no different but, as yet, attempts to elucidate the complex interaction between heart and kidneys has failed. Although cardiac and renal disease are often diagnosed together, it is clear that a straightforward causal relationship does not exist. Disease in either serves as a risk factor for disease in the other and perpetuates the progression of that disease, but why this is so is unclear. Whilst th

| Full text
In brief

August 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:156–7

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

SAPIEN valve positive results Clinicians have achieved successful one-year outcomes in high-risk or inoperable patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement during the first two years since release of the valve (Sapien®, Edwards) commercially, according to results presented at the Euro PCR 2001 meeting in Paris, France. Despite high predicted mortality and multiple co-morbidities in many of these patients, survival at one year was 76% in the 1,038 patients treated as part of Cohort I (first year of commercialisation), and 77% in the 1,269 patients treated as part of Cohort II (second year of commercialisation).  Since November

| Full text

August 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18(Suppl 2):s1-s15

Lessons to be learned from recent studies of anaemia management in chronic kidney disease

Philip A Kalra

Abstract

Epidemiology of anaemia in CKD The likelihood of anaemia occurring in CKD increases as renal function declines. All patients receiving haemodialysis therapy will require treatment for anaemia, and so too will almost all of those receiving peritoneal dialysis (the difference accounted for by haemodialysis exposing the patient to a greater inflammatory state, and also regular minor blood losses). Below a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 45 ml/min, erythropoietin secretion by the kidney declines and when patients enter stage 4 CKD (eGFR < 30 ml/min), around 30–40% will be anaemic. Aetiology of anaemia in CKD Figure 1. Factors contributi

| Full text

June 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:111–12

In brief

Abstract

Controversial salt paper published A new European study has caused controversy by suggesting that lowering salt intake may not be beneficial. The study, published recently in JAMA (May 4th 2011 issue), was conducted by a team from the University of Leuven, Belgium. They followed 3,681 participants who were free of cardiovascular disease at baseline for a median of 7.9 years, and found an inverse relationship between cardiovascular deaths and 24-hour sodium excretion (which correlates to salt intake), although systolic blood pressure was higher with higher salt intake. But an editorial in the Lancet (May 12th 2011 issue) criticises the study,

| Full text
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to print this page.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to download PDF's.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now