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Tag Archives: COMPASS

September 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:91

In brief

BJC Staff

Abstract

Mike is a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and an interventional cardiologist at the Beth Israel Deaconess in Boston, USA. He is the founder and director of the academic research organization PERFUSE and has been principal investigator or has led core services for over 120 clinical trials, the results of which have been published in leading journals. Mike is also an active user of Twitter (@CMichaelGibson). Amar is a Consultant in Diabetes and Endocrinology at the Good Hope Hospital, Sutton Coldfield, West Midlands. A regular contributor to the journal, Amar has previously been very active in the Young Diabetologists and Endoc

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November 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:133

In brief

BJC Staff

Abstract

Self-monitoring of type 2 diabetes cuts costs Self-monitoring of type 2 diabetes used in combination with an electronic feedback system results in considerable savings on health care costs and also travel costs for patients, especially in sparsely populated areas, a new study shows. The study, carried out in Northern Karelia by the University of Eastern Finland, found that by replacing half of the required follow-up visits for type 2 diabetes with self-measurements and electronic feedback, total costs of glycated haemoglobin monitoring were reduced by nearly 60%. The annual per-patient cost was down from 280 euros to 120 euros. Fewer follow-u

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October 2017

ESC 2017: COMPASS steers on anticoagulation in stable cardiovascular disease

Chris Allen

Abstract

Over a mean follow-up of 23 months, there was a marked decrease in the primary composite end point of cardiovascular death, stroke, or myocardial infarction in the combination therapy group by 24% (hazard ration [HR] 0.76; 95% CI 0.66-0.86; p<0.001) over aspirin monotherapy, and improved survival by 18%. The trial terminated prematurely by the data monitoring committee due to due to overwhelming efficacy. Rivaroxaban monotherapy showed no efficacy benefit. The anticipated trade-off was apparent with increased major bleeding in the combination therapy arm (HR 1.70, 95% CI 1.40–2.05; p<0.001), although fatal and intracranial bleeds wer

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