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Tag Archives: computed tomography

July 2020 Br J Cardiol 2020;27:97–9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2020.024

Computed tomography artefact finding of pacing lead perforation

Holly Morgan, Christopher Williams, Robert A Bleasdale

Abstract

Introduction There has been a significant increase in the use of computed tomography (CT) imaging over the last 20 years, both in terms of the number of patients being imaged and the number of imaging studies per patient. Between 1997 and 2006 the incidence of CT scanning in the US has more than doubled.1 A consequence of increased use is the detection, in increasing numbers, of incidental findings and artefacts.2 An artefact is defined as any discrepancy between what is identified on the CT image and the true appearance of the object.3 Detection of incidental findings and artefacts are particularly prevalent in patients with metallic foreign

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August 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:95–6

General news

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Improvements in patient care mean hundreds more people are surviving heart failure, a new independent study has found. The latest report from the National Heart Failure Audit (April 2015– March 2016) (link below) has found that the mortality rate for people admitted to hospital with heart failure has dropped from 9.6% the previous year to 8.9%. The reduction in the mortality rate means that in the region of 500 lives have been saved in the past year compared to 2014–15. An assessment of patients admitted to hospital with heart failure at NHS Trusts also shows that more people are being provided with crucial medicines for heart disease as

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March 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:7–9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.002

Endocarditis: the complementary roles of CT and echocardiography

Susanna Price

Abstract

The case study in this issue (see pages 46–7) demonstrates a potential use of CT scanning in the diagnosis of a patient with endocarditis. Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated multi-detector cardiac computed tomography (MDCT) scanning has been proposed by many to have potential in the evaluation of endocarditis by demonstration of vegetations, complications (coronary artery occlusion, fistulae) and peripheral embolism.3 The major limitations of the technique include availability, spatial resolution, failure to demonstrate leaflet perforations and lack of haemodynamic information (table 1). Further, CT findings have not been correlated with clinica

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March 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:110

Surgery for palpitations?

Peadar F McKeown, Ian B A Menown, Paul F Rice

Abstract

Physical examination, electrocardiography, chest x-ray and a Bruce exercise stress test were unremarkable. A 24-hour tape revealed intermittent ventricular ectopics that coincided with his symptoms of palpitations. On non-standard views, echocardiography showed a large echolucent mass that was compressing the right ventricle (figure 1A). Left ventricular ejection fraction was preserved. Computed tomography (CT) of chest and abdomen demonstrated a massive lobulated cyst in the anterior mediastinum, arising from the pericardium, measuring 15.3 cm x 8.2 cm (figure 1B). CT-guided aspiration (figure 1C) obtained 600 ml of straw-coloured fluid (tra

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July 2006 Br J Cardiol (Acute Interv Cardiol) 2006;13:AIC 49–AIC 56

Current status of non-invasive coronary angiography for the diagnosis of coronary artery stenosis

Kaeng W Lee, Jonathan Panting

Abstract

No content available

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July 2002 Br J Cardiol 2002;9:394-400

Atherosclerosis imaging and coronary calcification

Matthew J Budoff

Abstract

No content available

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