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Tag Archives: congenital heart disease

December 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:159–60 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.033

Percutaneous endovascular repair of congenital interruption of the thoracic aorta

Richard Armstrong, Kevin Walsh, David Mulcahy

Abstract

Figure 1. Transthoracic echocardiogram showing cessation of flow in the descending aorta Figure 2. Three-dimensional reconstruction of computed tomography (CT) aortogram showing interruption of thoracic aorta Case An asymptomatic 28-year-old man with an incidental finding of hypertension at a routine visa renewal medical presented to outpatients for review and further investigation. Significant radiofemoral delay was found on palpation of pulses, and an ejection systolic murmur heard over the praecordium. Blood pressure was recorded as 190/70 mmHg, despite therapy including irbesartan 300 mg, amlodipine 5 mg and atenolol 50 mg. Transthoracic

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October 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:135–7 Online First

News from ESC 2018: Is it safe for women with heart disease to become pregnant?

BJC Staff

Abstract

European Society of Cardiology congress 2018, held in Munich Professor Jolien Roos-Hesselink, said: “Pregnancy is safe for most women with heart disease but for some it is too risky. Our study shows that fewer women with heart disease die or have heart failure during pregnancy than 10 years ago. However, nearly one in 10 women with pulmonary arterial hypertension died during pregnancy or early post-partum.” She added that pre-pregnancy counselling is crucial to identify women who should be advised against pregnancy, for instance in those with severe valvular heart disease, and to discuss the risks, options and to initiate timely treatment

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June 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:46–7 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.015

Congenital heart disease: an ageing problem

Gabrielle Norrish, Juan Pablo Kaski

Abstract

It is, therefore, with interest that we read the meta-analysis of long-term survival of individuals born with CHD by Best and Rankin.4 Utilising population-based studies, they report a pooled one-year, five-year and 10-year survival for all CHD of 87%, 85.4% and 81.4%, respectively. The survival estimates for individual CHD lesions differed, with ‘high-risk lesions’, such as tricuspid atresia or common arterial trunk, having a poorer survival than ‘simple lesions’, such as atrial septal defect (ASD) or ventricular septal defect (VSD), confirming what is seen in clinical practice. There were some surprising findings, including a worse

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Pacing in patients with congenital heart disease: part 3

March 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:38 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.006

Pacing in patients with congenital heart disease: part 3

Khaled Albouaini, Archana Rao, David Ramsdale

Abstract

Introduction In the first article, we discussed those anomalies that are usually encountered by chance at, or just prior to, implantation; patent foramen ovale/atrial septal defect, Ebstein’s anomaly and ventricular septal defect, and the potential problems that they may provide to the device implanter. In the second article, we discussed the challenge of device implantation in patients with more complex congenital structural cardiac defects, which the operator should be aware of prior to device implantation, including congenitally corrected L-transposition of great arteries, tetralogy of Fallot and tricuspid atresia/univentricular heart. I

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Pacing in patients with congenital heart disease: part 2

November 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:151–3 doi:10.5837/bjc/2013.31

Pacing in patients with congenital heart disease: part 2

Khaled Albouaini, Archana Rao, David Ramsdale

Abstract

Introduction In the previous article, we discussed those anomalies that are usually encountered by chance at, or just prior to, implantation: patent foramen ovale/atrial septal defect, Ebstein’s anomaly and ventricular septal defect, and the potential problems that they may provide to the device implanter. In this and the next article, we will discuss the challenge of device implantation in patients with more complex congenital structural cardiac defects, which the operator should be aware of prior to device implantation. In this paper we include congenitally corrected L-transposition of great arteries (L-TGA), tetralogy of Fallot and tricu

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Pacing in patients with congenital heart disease: part 1

September 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:117–20 doi:10.5837/bjc/2013.028

Pacing in patients with congenital heart disease: part 1

Khaled Albouaini, Archana Rao, David Ramsdale

Abstract

Introduction The vast majority of patients requiring pacemaker or defibrillator implantation have structurally normal hearts and patients with congenital cardiac abnormalities constitute only a small proportion. The latter can be divided into two groups. The first includes those with undiscovered congenital abnormalities, which do not give rise to symptoms or obvious physical signs, such as dextrocardia, persistent left-sided superior vena cava, atrial septal defect and patent foramen ovale. The second group includes those who are known to have structural cardiac abnormalities, such as Ebstein’s anomaly, ventricular septal defect, transposi

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January 2007 Br J Cardiol 2007;14:5-7

Adult congenital heart disease: time for a national framework

Michael A Gatzoulis

Abstract

No content available

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November 2005 Br J Cardiol (Acute Interv Cardiol) 2005;12:AIC 98–AIC 100

An unusual pulmonary embolus

Umeer Waheed, Phang Boon Lim, Jeremy Cordingley, Mike Mullen

Abstract

No content available

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February 2002 Br J Cardiol 2002;9:99-102

Atrial septal defects – a differential diagnosis for breathlessness in adults and the elderly

Mark S Turner, Anthony P Salmon, Andrew J Marshall

Abstract

No content available

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February 2002 Br J Cardiol 2002;9:65-67

Adult congenital heart disease: time for a national framework

Michael A Gatzoulis

Abstract

No content available

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